Luni Solar Calendar

Calendar Format Instructions

Calendar Format Instructions

Each lunation begins with the day following the sighting of the first visible crescent moon. This sighting typically occurs 18-24 hours after conjunction. The first day of every lunation is called New Moon day. This, the first of every month, is followed by the six work days on the 2ndthrough the 7th of the month. On the 8th of every month comes the first seventh-day Sabbath. Three weeks follow in succession.

On the last Sabbath evening of a 29 day month, the next visible crescent should be seen. On a thirty day lunation, one translation day follows the last Sabbath and the first visible crescent will be seen that evening. New Moon is not a seventh-day Sabbath but is in a class of worship day by itself. It is a time of rededication of one’s life to Yahuwah God. Translation days are regular work days.

Months are either 29 or 30 days in length. No month has more than 30 days. If, due to cloud cover, no new moon is visible, the next month starts the day after the 30th. Because lunar months are technically 29.5 days long, the months will typically rotate: 29-day, 30-day, 29-day, 30-day. However, this is not always the case. When two 29-day months occur in a row, later two 30-day months will come in a row.

One method of keeping on track is the 177-day count. Because lunations are 29.5 days long, 29.5 X 6 (months) = 177 days.

Because the pagan/papal Gregorian calendar has continuously cycling weeks, New Moon day establishes which Gregorian day the next four seventh-day Sabbaths will fall on.

The biggest difference between Yahuwah’s calendar and the calendars in use today is how the weeks cycle through the year. The Gregorian calendar, like the Julian calendar before it, has a continuous cycle of unending weeks, one after the other. The Creator’s calendar does not. The weekly cycle started over with the appearance of each new moon. This is how each month’s calendar looked for the night preceding the day:

Again, the first visible crescent not only began each new month, it also restarted the weekly cycle. As a result, the seventh-day Sabbath always fell on the 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th of the month. The luni-solar calendar explains why, every time a date is given for a seventh-day Sabbath in the Bible, the Sabbath always falls on the 8th, 15th, 22nd and 29th. (The Great Calendar Controversy, pp. 13-14.)

Each lunation begins with the day following the sighting of the first visible crescent moon. This sighting typically occurs 18-24 hours after conjunction. The first day of every lunation is called New Moon day. This, the first of every month, is followed by the six work days on the 2nd through the 7th of the month. On the 8th of every month comes the first seventh-day Sabbath. Three weeks follow in succession.

On the last Sabbath evening of a 29 day month, the next visible crescent should be seen. On a thirty day lunation, one translation day follows the last Sabbath and the first visible crescent will be seen that evening. New Moon is not a seventh-day Sabbath but is in a class of worship day by itself. It is a time of rededication of one’s life to Yahuwah God. Translation days are regular work days.

One method of keeping on track is the 177-day count. Because lunations are 29.5 days long, 29.5 X 6 (months) = 177 days.

Luni-Solar Calendar with Feasts Days

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