Ancient Grimoires
Grimoires are Ancient text manuscripts used in High Magick and the Black Arts to conjure Demonic, Celestial, Olympic and Angelic beings. They provide the Magician with the sigils or seals of each Diety and a description of how they will appear in form and what tasks they can do for your bidding. Some of these are purely systems of Magick. Some of these books can be easily found on Ebay or Amazon. But some are very hard to find and are not in print anymore. This is where you will have to search for quite some time to find a seller. I myself collect antique versions of these books… so I have old copies and new copies of the same books. Many of them are very confusing and useless books to the newbe in magick… but for the experienced Magician, they are a great asset. This is a list of all the ones I that I know of and there are others out there that I keep coming across yet I do not feel like spending thousands of dollars on a book that is all in Latin. You can search the internet and find allot of these books in PDF format which you can download… but it is not the same as having the real thing sitting in your hands or on your alter.
*Some of these books are known by different names and some; such as the Goetia are known by 4 different names.*

  1. The Key of Solomon
  2. The Lemegeton (or Lesser Key of Solomon) also know as the Goetia
  3. The Goetia or Theurgia the same as above… the Lemegeton
  4. Grimorium Verum (based on The Key of Solomon)
  5. Grimoire of Honorius or also called the Grimoire of Pope Honious
  6. The Book of Sacred Magic of Abra-Melin the Mage
  7. The Book of Black Magic and of Pacts
  8. True Black Magic (or The Secrets of Secrets, draws on The Key of Solomon)
  9. Grand Grimoire (or Red Dragon)
  10. The Magus by Francis Barrett
  11. The Black Pullet (or Treasure of the Old Man of the Pyramids or Black Screech Owl)
  12. Verus Jesuitarum Libellus (or True Magical Works of the Jesuits) Supposed Fake
  13. Three Books of Occult Philosophy
  14. Mysteria Magica
  15. The Golden Dawn not a book on conjuring but a system of Magick
  16. The Grimoire of Armadel *This one is my all time favorite Grimoire*
  17. Summoning Spirits by Konstantinos and is a newer book
  18. The Book of Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage
  19. The Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses
  20. The Necronomicon… Fake but…. contains real Ancient Deities and so it is not to be played with.
  21. Arbatel of Magick
  22. Ars Paulina or the Pauline Art
  23. Ars Armadel
  24. Ars Nova
  25. Ars Notoria
  26. The Heptameron
  27. The Black Raven by Dr. Faust also known as The Threefold Coercion of Hell
  28. The Arbatel of Magick
  29. The Golden Dawn by Isreal Regardie
  30. The Grimoire of Pope Leo French Grinmoire – Enchiridion Leonis Papae
  31. Malleus Daemonum Exorcist Manual – known as the Hammer of Demons 1620
  32. The Sword of Moses
  33. The Secret Grimoire of Turiel
  34. Three Books of Occult Philosophy Cornelius Agrippa
  35. The Fourth Book of Occult Philosophy Cornelius Agrippa

SATANISM
Satanism is devil worship, the deification of Lucifer, the fallen angel. Lucifer was God’s most beautiful angel. He was an angel of light and music. Such was his beauty and talent, he grew proud and jealous of God. Thus, he revolted against the Almighty. But God squashed this revolution and Lucifer fell to earth in a bolt of lightning, together with a third of heaven’s angels who took his side. They were cast into the pit of despair – Hell. Lucifer is Satan – the Devil, and the angels who had fallen with him became his demons. Together, they fight a never-ending battle against God. They seek to hurt God through His creation – humanity (that’s us!). Satanism has its roots in Christianity. The Satanists awaits the coming of the anti-Christ, as predicted in the Bible. Thus we see that in order to worship the Devil, you have to first believe in God. To be a Satanist, you have to recognise Christianity as the one true religion in order to oppose it.
As a philosophy, the tenets of Satanism promise a very good time for one and all. In Aleister Crowley’s Book Of Magic, he wrote: "Do what thou wilt shall be the whole Law." He was a renowned English Satanist of Edwardian times. From this we see that Satanism is about gratification od the senses. Without shame or guilt. Without a thought about sin. With an inordinate love of evil. A true Satanist will always choose evil over good. He will have no qualms about killing, torture, having sex with his parents, siblings, animals… etc. In fact, the more perverse and despicable the act, the more pleasing it is to Lucifer. Satanic rites normally revolve around sex, drugs and live sacrifices. The ceremonial slaying of innocent virgins, babies, pregnant women…; these are the most pleasing sacrifices to Satan. Satan is the enemy of God and all that is good. To please him, one has to be as bad as one can be. Consider the fun most bad boys and girls have, it is not hard to see the appeal of Satanism.
In the old days, there were people like the Marquis de Sade, a French nobleman in the reign of King Louie XIV. He reviled the teachings of Christ and the Church and preached the philosophy of Satan. He’d advise people to torture, mutilate and kill. To rob, cheat and steal. To commit incest, adultery, bestiality, necrophilia. In short, he encourgaed people to do whatever they felt like doing without conscience or guilt. Such hedonistic nihilism is an important aspect of Satanism. For where God has rules and regulations, Satan’s promise is pleasure and freedom with no bounds at all. Throughout the ages, many have followed this same path of soul destruction only to find that it has led to despair. For Satan’s promise of power and success are granted but only to a chosen few. They are granted this so as to serve as role models for others to follow. They are glamorous high priests and priestesses of Devil worship. They often are in the forms of successful tycoons, movie stars, pop stars and models.
Satanism is alive and very powerful in the world today. Many people worship the Devil and they do not even know it. All gratification of selfishness, greed, lust, vanity and power is an offering on the altar of the Devil. The Devil has his agents in many fields of operation in the modern world. With the rise of materialism and the decline of spirituality, we see we are entering a golden age for Satan. Never has his power been so strong in the world as today. Children grow up worshipping success, not God. They fear failure more than damnation. And throughout their lives, they will nurse this dark seed of Satan in their hearts which can explode anytime into the flkowers of violence, murder and other atrocities. This dark seed is planted by various media sources such as music, movies and television. And especially in advertisements, where happiness and satisfaction is promised by the purchase of a product. In fact, Satan’s influence is everywhere. Listen carefully to what people tell you. Judge for yourself if what they say is right or wrong. Chances are, they are hollow shells acting as a poisonous nest for a host of demonic agents from Hell!
So gentle reader, do not misunderstand. Satanism is not limited to a bunch of loonies having orgies and sacrificing a few helpless animals. It is insidious and everywhere. It is all powerful. If you believe in God, you have to believe in the Devil as well. If you don’t believe in God, then you MUST believe in the Devil for that is exactly what Satan wants. He wants your apathy, your cruelty, your greed, your selfishness, your lust. Satan wants your worship. But beware, the Devil is the father of all lies. And the path of endless earthly pleasures he points out to one and all often turns out to be the road to ruin, the path of destruction. The highway to Hell… and one promise you can be assured the Devil will keep, is that you will join him in Hell if you do his bidding on Earth.
However, if the topic of Satanism still interests you, you must check out the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead – the Necronomicon by the Mad Arab Abdul Azared. It is the official book of demonology and many Satanists subscribe to it as it helps them break further away from Christianity. Also, there is the Satanic Bible by Anton La Vey, but this is more for beginners. The works of Crowley, de Sade and the diaries of Giles de Retz explore the many interesting possiilities of Satanism. However, should you have trouble locating these rare and precious tomes, keep an eye out for more posts as I will be looking further into the dark misty regions of Devil worship.

 

DEMONOLOGY OF THE PHARISEES

The Jewish Religion: Its Influence Today by Elizabeth Dilling Ch. VIII: DEMONOLOGY OF THE PHARISEES

[Editor’s Note: Elizabeth Dilling, all things considered, was a prophetess in her own time. Her various works, which include her exposure of the Zionist Jewish infiltration of the United States of America and her analysis of Bolshevism, Communism and Zionism as one Beast with numerous names, are a testament to her courage and her foresight in revealing the truth during a period of American history when to speak out was to risk the inevitable attacks by the Jewish establishment.

Groups like the American Jewish Congress and B’nai Brith International and their attack-dog the Anti-Defamation League, were always ready and willing to vilify anyone who dared to speak out about their plans to implement their one world government and Elizabeth Dilling was forced to deal with their Talmudic tactics from the moment she picked up the sword of truth.

Each chapter of her book is preceded by the Forward and an Introduction. Readers who go beyond Chapter One will find it convenient to just scroll down the page until the start of the new chapter.]

The Jewish Religion: Its Influence Today
by Elizabeth Dilling
Ch. VIII: DEMONOLOGY OF THE PHARISEES

So-called “Judaism” is nothing but Babylonian Talmudic Pharisaism, which at base is crass paganism concocted through the centuries. Descriptions concocted for this very old satanism, such as “immanence” (Spinoza) “emanation” (Talmudic Cabala), “dialectical materialism” (Marx) merely dress up old pagan concepts….

All forms of demonology were adopted by the Pharisees and incorporated into so-called Judaism. Demons of the privy, of the night, of every phase of nature, were and are catered to by the tenets and customs of this sect. The Talmud book of Yadayim (hands) is, for example, on ritual hand-washing in connection with Pharisee demonology. The Talmud is larded with occult works and practices.

Jewish Demonism ~ Between the world of the flesh and the world of the spirit, Jewish superstition imagines a middle ground inhabited by angels and demons. During the thirteenth century Jewish demonology swelled its ranks with Latin, French, and German intruders who ended up becoming thoroughly integrated with the natives recorded in the Talmud.

The Pharisee custom in Christ’s time of drizzling water alternately on the hands, to carry off demons (who presumably live in water) is still in force. The “Code of Jewish Law” (Schulchan Aruch), which is a digested “Mishna” of the Talmud, holds that an evil spirit takes over a sleeping person:

“When he rises from his sleep the evil spirit departs from his entire body excepting from his fingers. From there the unclean spirit does not depart unless he spills water on them three times alternately. One is not permitted to walk four cubits without having his hands washed.” (Schulchan Aruch, Vol. 1, Chapter II: Hebrew Publishing Co. 77-9 Delancey St., New York, copyright 1927).

Says the Soncino Edition of the Talmud, in the Introduction to Yadayim (handwashing):

“This … rite … formed one of the chief breaches between Jesus and the Pharisees.” (page 545) When the Pharisees came to Christ, baiting Him about His Apostles not doing these handwashing rituals, He came back at them, saying that they were hypocrites, “teaching for doctrines the commandments of men … Full well ye reject the commandment of God that ye may keep your own tradition.” (See Matthew 15)

Other practices are condoned in Judaism.

Despite Moses’ orders (Deuteronomy 18:10-12): “There shall not be found among you any one that maketh his son or daughter to pass through the fire (see Ritual Murder herein) or that useth divination, or an observer of times [astrology] or an enchanter, or a witch, or a charmer or a consulter with familiar spirits, or a necromancer.

For all that do these things are an abomination unto the Lord: and because of the abominations the Lord thy God doth drive them out from before thee.” (Deuteronomy 18:10-12) Yet all of these are permitted by Judaistic Pharisee scripture. (See, for example, the Jewish Talmud, Sanhedrin 65a-b, Exhibits 70, 71)

Citing this very Scriptural passage, and reversing it, the Talmudic “sages” hold that calling up demons to aid with sorcery is not idolatry since demons are not thereby worshiped!

The ancient practice of spirits speaking from the privates by soothsaying is dwelt upon in Judaism and this practice is loathsomely attributed to Jesus (“He practiced enchantment by means of his membrum” — see the Talmud, Sanhedrin 105 a-b, Exhibit 108).

“Ye shall not use enchantment nor observe times.” (another of Moses’ admonitions in Leviticus 19:26) The “sages” also distort this clear scripture and declare: “This refers to those who practice enchantment by means of weasels, birds, and fish” — thus forbidding what no one cares to do anyway, and so as to open the way for pagan practices elsewhere permitted. (See Exhibit 74)

The Worship of the Golden Calf by Nicholas Poussin, an example of biblical pagan worship

The Christian need not wallow in darkness. In the 1905 Jewish Encyclopedia it was already clearly written down that the Pharisees took over “Judaism,” removed all “obnoxious verbiage” concerning God, such as attributing to Him Intelligence and control over this world and bestowed all Biblical powers ascribed to Him to lesser spirits, or “angelic powers.”

And, with the angelology and Demonology (of Babylon) and the Ma‘asek Bereshit and Ma‘aseh Merkabah, they nullified the Bible into pantheism. Anthropomorphism, or attributing to God any human quality like Intelligence, Love, or Control, such as God gave man over the animal world, was and is “obnoxious” to the Pharisee. (See, for example, the Jewish Encyclopedia, Exhibit 264, upper left column)

The Ma‘aseh Mercabah and Ma‘aseh Bereshit are called in Judaism, the very basis of this occult gnosticism. Pretending to be based upon Genesis and Ezekiel’s chariot throne of God vision (Ezekiel I), this last “mystery” is called “Merkabah.”

The words “by other means” are the most significant in the definition of the Merkabah in the Jewish Encyclopedia (pages 499-500): “The mysteries rest on the belief in the reality of things seen in an ecstatic state brought about by ablutions, fast, fervent invocations, incantations, and by other means … the Merkabah rider must provide himself with amulets or seals containing mysterious names … The central figure in the theophany, however, is the ‘Prince of the Face,’ Metatron … He is the one who imparted to man all the knowledge of heaven and of the past and the future.”

Even burning children to the demon Molech for black occult power is allowed today by the supreme scriptures of Pharisaic Judaism. (See “Ritual Murder” herein)

Jewish Pentagram

Jewish Magic

Rabbi Joshua Trachtenberg, listed in Who’s Who in American Jewry, in his defensive yet illuminating book, Jewish Magic and Superstition (Behrmann’s, N.Y., 1939), writing of the age-long reputation of Jews as practitioners of black magic and all occult demonistic rites, states (Second chapter, entitled “The Truth Behind the Legend”):

“The sources indicate that Jews were at least acquainted with methods of inducing disease and death, of arousing and killing passion, of forcing people to do their bidding, of employing demons for divinatory and other purposes … We find accounts of the magician’s power to project his soul to far-distant places, there to perform an errand, and then return to his comatose body.” (Page 13)

“Jewish magic … functioned within the framework of the Jewish religion.” (Page 15)

Rabbi Trachtenberg also states:

“Knowledge of the names, through which Jewish magic worked, was inaccessible to women, for it required not only a thorough training in Hebrew and Aramaic, which most of them lacked, but also a deep immersion in mystical lore from which they were barred … Early mystical and magical lore was successfully guarded by a limited oral transmission. The secret lore of the Kalonymides [Note: who brought it from Babylonia] … was first written down in the 13th Century … Jewish life had turned more and more inward … and intensive study of the Talmud had become almost its sole intellectual pursuit … But the German Kabbalah never attained the theoretical depth of its Spanish counterpart, nor did it exert so much influence.” (Pages 16-17, same publication)

“So we may say that every Jew whose desire led him thither essayed a little magic in a small way. But it was generally recognized that only a minor portion of the mystical lore had found its way into books; much of it remained private, jealously guarded property.” (page 18)

In the same work, and under the title of “Forbidden and Permitted,” Trachtenberg says: “The Bible had pronounced an unqualified condemnation of sorcery. The Talmud … pursued its customary function of clarifying and classifying Jewish law, and so broke up the all-inclusive category of sorcery into several divisions …” Then are cited various hairsplittings, ending with an admission that the Talmud actually permits the very proscribed or forbidden acts denounced by the Bible.

Trachtenberg sums up: “From a practical standpoint, they succeeded in effectively excluding from the proscribed ‘magic’ all the forms current among Jews.” (Pages 19-20)

The Universal Jewish Encyclopedia cites Rabbi Trachtenberg Jewish Magic and Superstition as a rabbinical authority on these subjects.

Habdalah

Says Rabbi Trachtenberg: “On Saturday evening, during the Habdalah ceremony which marks the beginning of the new week, another libation was offered to the spirits, as part of the ritual. Some of the wine was poured upon the ground ‘as a good omen for the entire week to symbolize good fortune and blessing.’” Rabbi Trachtenberg then proceeds to de-emphasize that this had any religious significance, and states:

“Moses Mat in the 16th Century wrote that this practice is intended to ‘give their portion to the company of Korah,’ namely, to the powers of evil. And that portion was not inconsiderable. As one rabbi in Silesia remarked, ‘If I had the wine that is poured upon the ground in Austria during Habdalah it would suffice to quench my thirst for a whole year!’ ” This custom of pouring out some wine over which a blessing has been recited, which appears again in the wedding ceremony, may have been considered by some people not as an offering to the spirits, but as a means of driving them off.” (page 167, Jewish Magic and Superstition).

Just preceding this, Rabbi Trachtenberg covers various food offerings to demons such as leaving a loaf of bread and cup of wine “left standing overnight,” which, to quote, is categorized: as ‘setting a table for the demons.’ Yet it continued to be done, sometimes with the frank admission that ‘it extends fullness of blessing over the entire week.’ During the Passover Seder a cup of wine is filled expressly for the Prophet Elijah, who is believed to visit every Jewish home on that occasion, and the door is opened for him to enter — this time the offering is to a good spirit, rather than an evil one.

One such Babylonian demon of the time was Pazuzu, Lord of Fevers and Plagues, Dark Angel of the Four Winds with rotting genitals from which he howls through sharpened teeth over stricken cities." William S. Burroughs in Cities of the Red Night. Painting byDusty Peterson

But during the same service, there is a late custom, which arose in German-Jewish circles, to pour out a drop of wine at the mention of each of the ten plagues, possibly to placate the evil spirits, who may be impelled by the reference to so many disasters to visit some of them upon the celebrants.

Israel Isserlein’s biographer wrote of him, ‘He always spilled some of the water from his cup before drinking,’ thus observing a universal Jewish custom going back to Talmudic times. The explanation then given was that the water might have been contaminated by a demon — but obviously merely spilling some of it doesn’t purify it all. The intention was to induce the demon to neutralize the possible ill effect of the water by making him a libation.” (same publication, pages 166-7)

Tashlik and Kapparah

Rabbi Trachtenberg cites the power of the Kapparah rites in Judaism.

In the first editions of the Shulhan Aruch, an accepted code of Judaism compiled by Joseph Caro, his reference to Tashlik being a “silly custom” was deleted, according to Rabbi Trachtenberg, “under the influence of the 16th century Polish annotator, Moses Isserles … The various features of the ceremony accentuate its superstitions and even magical character.”

Tashlik is the current and ancient Pharisee custom of dropping crumbs into a river or body of water at Rosh Hashonah, or flapping the garments at demons, as the Hasidim Jews do, to appease them. Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges in New York, have been much used for this, says the Jewish Encyclopedia of 1905 (under “Tashlik”). Rabbi Trachtenberg also states:

“Fowl are closely associated with the spirits in Jewish and non-Jewish lore, and are the commonest oblation to them … The cock is employed to represent a man, the hen, a woman, in many magic rites. The circles which are described about the head of the individual, and the numbers three and seven, are well-known magical elements. The words which effectuate the substitution have all the earmarks of a typical incantation. In the earlier texts the words ‘this is my atonement’ are not present; they were added so that the initials of the Hebrew terms might form the word hatash, ‘which is the name of the angel appointed over this.’ “

Rabbi reads words of Kapparah as rooster draws evil out of him.

Rabbi Trachtenberg continues:

“The belief that evil spirits roost on roofs occurs often (the Talmud places them under the eaves) … In view of this requirement that the entrails be thrown on a roof acquires special significance. Thus analyzed there can be little doubt of the true meaning of the rite, which is still observed today. It is probably the most blatantly superstitious practice to have entered Jewish religious usage, for where the significance of other such practices has long since been lost sight of, the purpose of this is too apparent to escape the dullest wits.” (same publication, pages 164-5)

“Not unrelated is the rite of Tashlik, observed on the first day of Rosh Hashonah … this ceremony represents merely the latest version of a complex of superstitious practices centering about the belief in the existence of spirits in bodies of Water … in later times Tashlik was postponed if the first day of the New Year fell on a Sabbath on the ground that carrying bread was a violation of the Sabbath rules.”

Various “explanations” customarily used as a “whited sepulchre” coverup for the stark paganism of Pharisaism are here mentioned by Trachtenberg, and then:

“These explanations only too patently evade the main issue, the bread offering to the spirits … Under Kabbalistic influence an attempt was made to limit the rite to shaking one’s clothes at the river-side … ” (page 166)

A picture appears in the Jewish Encyclopedia showing Jews with bags of bread at the river-side performing the Tashlik ceremony of appeasing the demons of the water.

The entire Jewish Talmud book of Yadayim (“hands”) is based upon the superstition that demons live in water. The Talmudist’s objective here is not cleanliness, but getting the “demons” off into water. Small wonder that Christ would have none of the Pharisee hand-washing voodoo in His life, because of which the Pharisees upbraided Him mercilessly.

Lilith — Favorite Demoness

Of the hordes of demons the Jew who would win out must use and dismiss, none is more prominent than Lilith. Some of the amulets meant to keep her in check, as reproduced from the Jewish Encyclopedia, appear in Exhibits 286 and 287.

Lilith is still quite popular with Satanic sects. Her owls are common symbolism used in black sorcery on the planet today. One such example would be Bohemian Grove.

Lilith is supposedly jealous of lying-in mothers and their new-born babies. Her main job is apparently “spawning demons.”

In his above noted publication, Rabbi Trachtenberg repeats the Talmudic tale that “when Adam was parted from Eve, he had relations with female demons who bore him demonic offspring.” He was at this for 130 years, we are told.

Says Trachtenberg (page 7):

“As a result of the legend of Adam’s relations with Lilit [another spelling] … the Lilits were most frequently singled out as the demons who embrace sleeping men and cause them to have nocturnal emissions which are the seed of a hybrid progeny … . As the demons whose special prey is lying-in women, it was found necessary to adopt an extensive series of protective measures against her … . We seem to have here a union of the night demon with the spirit that presides over pregnancy, influenced no doubt by the character of the Babylonian Lamassu, and the lamiae and striga of Greek and Roman folklore.”

To Fig

One of the most characteristic and least charming of the Talmudic customs is the gesture “to fig.” This is cited in Rabbi Trachtenberg’s work (page 162) as one of the

“ … most widely used anti-demonic devices … It is made by closing the fist and inserting the thumb between the two fingers. Its particularly obnoxious character … derives from the fact that it is meant as an obscene representation of the sexual act. Menasseh ben Israel was correct both in his explanation of the intent of this gesture, and his association of it with the Talmudic recommendation that to protect oneself against the evil eye one should place his right thumb in his left fist and his left thumb in his right fist … ‘When a man encloses his thumb in his fist he simulates a pregnant woman, and they, the spirits, do not harm him.’ People who employed this gesture were warned that it infuriates the demons at the same time that it renders them harmless; therefore a weak person, ‘especially one who is dangerously ill,’ should forebear to use it, for the spirits may subsequently take vengeance on him.”

The very popular Jewish hand gesture, an anti-demonic device, an obscene representation of the sexual act used also as protection against the evil eye.

“Variations on this theme were also employed: For safety on a journey one should place the little finger of the right hand in the left fist and recite a charm formula. The fingers were used as phallic symbols to the same end, and we learn that a witch is transfixed when one raises his index finger and thumb and recites the name ‘Uriel’ seven times, or that an ‘evil impulse’ may be vanquished by pressing the thumbs on the ground, repeating ‘Pipi’ nine times and spitting.”

Here, as in all cases, the documentation of Rabbi Trachtenberg was monumental.

Spirits and Cemeteries

“Obviously the spirits can help as well as harm the living … An observant visitor to the tomb of Simon bar Yohai, for instance, at Meron, Palestine, will discern a host of written entreaties for the saint’s aid [Note: the “saint” was a second century Talmudic voodoo-worker associated with the Zohar, principal multi-volumed work of the Jewish Cabala] … The ancient practice of visiting the cemetery to entreat the offices of deceased relatives or scholars persisted … In addition to such individual visits, there grew up the custom of the entire congregation repairing to the cemetery annually on several occasions, such as the seven ‘rain fasts,’ and on Tisha ‘B ‘ab … and on the eves of New Year and the Day of Atonement, ‘that the dead may beseech mercy on our behalf.’ “ (Jewish Magic and Superstition by Trachtenberg, page 64)

“The custom of washing the hands after a funeral is very widespread … . Efforts were made to find a Biblical precedent for this act, but … there was a general admission that it was done ‘to dispel the spirits of uncleanness’ which cling to one’s person, these being ‘the demons that follow them home.’”(page 179, same publication).

Today, one may note Jews at such places as Temple Sholom, on elegant Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, dripping water on their hands after a funeral.

The Jewish Encyclopedia (under “Cemetery”) refers to the custom of visiting the cemetery to consult the spirits, and cites the Talmud, Niddah l7a. There it is stated that one “spending a night in a graveyard in order that a spirit of uncleanness may rest upon him — to enable him to foretell the future might sometimes be exposed to danger.” (Talmud, Soncino edition, Niddah, page 113) Reference to this practice is also made in Sanhedrin 65b (See Exhibit 72). That cemeteries are infested with spirits and demons is the general idea.

In this nineteenth-century illustration, John Dee (1527-1608), famous mathematician, philosopher, and astrologer for Queen Elizabeth, holds a torch while an adept Talmudic necromancer consults with a spirit.

Jewish Necromancy

Says Rabbi Trachtenberg:

“The future is an open book to the denizens of the supernatural realm, and like the demons and the angels, the deceased can by eavesdropping pick up the latest decisions of the court on high; ‘they flit through the universe to hear what has been decreed.’ Then they report back to intimates on earth, in dreams or personal appearances … But in general the spirit-world is chary of its secrets and can be induced to reveal them only by magical means … mystical invocations and occult rites are effective in forcing the dead to obey the magician’s will. The art of necromancy is a specialized function of sorcery.” (Jewish Magic and Superstition, page 65)

And:

“The official language of the celestial court is Hebrew … This principle was advanced in the Talmud.” (page 74)

In a chapter “The War With the Spirits,” Rabbi Trachtenberg states:

“The methods of warding off the spirits fell into three general categories: 1. to drive them away … 2. to buy them off with gifts, to bribe them and thus conciliate them; 3. to deceive them by disguising their intended victims, or by pretending that the situation was other than what it was. Each of these methods, and often two or three of them combined, was known and employed by Jews even found expression in special ceremonies which have become part and parcel of Jewish ritual.”

Rabbi Trachtenberg mentions putting a severed foreskin in a bowl of water, with attendants dipping their fingers in bloody fluid, and burying the circumcizer with the foreskins he has severed, as demonic ritual. The unluckiness of even numbers except on special nights when four cups of wine, instead of an odd number may be imbibed, the protective, and divine nature of Talmud study for blunting demons, and the recitation of the Shema at night are noted by the Rabbi, and he states:

“There was no attempt to disguise the purpose of this prayer-service; it was frankly admitted time and again that ‘it exists only because of the demons.” He quotes: ”at my right Michael, at my left Gabriel, before me Uriel, behind me Raphael.” This is nothing more than the Jewish version of the ancient Babylonian incantation, ‘Shamash before me, behind me Sin, Nergal at my right, Ninib at my left,’ or ‘May the good Shedu at my right, the good Lamassu at my left,’ etc. (Jewish Magic and Superstition, page 156)

“The final weapon in the anti-demonic strategy is that of deceit.” Apart from wailers at weddings to deceive the demons into thinking it a sad instead of glad occasion, breaking a glass at a wedding and the Shofar being blown to scare the demons, this strategy of deceit, says the Rabbi, is “most commonly employed in changing an invalid’s name so that the spirits who might be charged with effecting his death would be unable to locate him … just as criminals adopt aliases to evade the police.” (same publication, page 168)

Under “Shinnuy-ha-shem” in the Jewish Encyclopedia, one may read the synagogue formula for changing the name of an invalid so as to fool the demons:

“When the Righteous Judgement has already decreed death from illness, our saintly rabbis said: Three things annul the decree; and one of them is changing the name of the patient. We therefore, in conformity with their advice, have changed the name of (mention here the former name) to the name of (mention the adopted name) who is now another person. The decree shall not have any force with regards to him …

Was Christ so wrong to call the Pharisees “Fools and blind”? (Matthew 23:17)

The Shulhan Aruch

Never worry about the spelling of a Talmudic word. As though promoting a program of confusion, as soon as you have identified one spelling, you find another. The above happens to be the spelling in the Universal Jewish Encyclopedia, although the name on the book itself is spelled: “Schulchan Aruch” (“Code of Jewish Law,” translated by Hyman E. Goldin; Hebrew Publishing Co., 77-9 Delancey St., N.Y., copyright 1927).

The Schulchan Aruch, says the Universal Jewish Encyclopedia, is the “standard authoritative source for Judaism. It is a compendium of the religious practices of the Jews.” A “Kitzur” or condensed compilation of this work is on sale at Jewish bookstores (Rabbi Solomon Ganzfried, Hebrew Publishing Co., 79 Delancey St., N.Y.).

It was compiled by Joseph Caro (1488-1575). He died in Safed, Palestine, seat of Jewish voodoo mysticism. He was one of those ousted from Spain in 1492 when Spain tired of facilitating “the golden age” for Talmudists.

Since Caro was accused of neglecting some of the customs of Eastern “Ashkenazi,” Polish-Russian-German Jews in favor of Spanish or Sephardic customs, additions were made to this boiled down compilation of the laws of the Talmud by Moses Isserles. It was first published in Venice in 1565, and, to quote: “It became practically canonical.” The Universal Jewish Encyclopedia complains, however, that ever since 1700, due to the exposures of Eisenmenger, the Shulhan Aruch caused anti-Semites to accuse the Jews of being “hostile to humanity … ”

The Kitzur, or abbreviated edition of the Shulhan Aruch, boils down the Talmud laws or Mishnaim, to expedite knowing such things as which shoe to put on in the morning to keep the demons in line, etc. It requires three chapters, for example, to tell the modern Jew how to behave in that beloved Talmudic subject — the privy.

Says Rabbi Trachtenberg: “In Talmudic times it was customary to rattle nuts in a jar to scare away the demons that frequent privies … .” and he cites other devices.

Sections VXXII to CXXV give directions for such petty observances as not bathing, or paring nails during the Tammuz fast. At its termination: “In the evening all enter the synagogue and take off their boots … . All should be seated on the ground, and only a few lights are lit just sufficient to enable them to say Lamentations and the special lamentations. Lamentations and the special lamentations are likewise said in a low tone with a weeping intonation.” (CXXIV, page 60)

“On the Sabbath during the nine days of Ab, it is the custom to call up to Maftir the Rabbi who knows how to lament.” (CXXII, page 59)

The excuse for keeping up this typical pagan Babylonian custom is that one must mourn for the loss of the Jerusalem Temple.

There are three obscene and senseless chapters on how to behave in a privy, much about excreta, and about demon-preventing handwashing from morning to night, against which Christ declaimed. Just the chapters on rules of the sabbath would wear out a piece of stone. For example, “One should not wash his hand upon the ground … because an evil spirit rests upon this water.” (Chapter XLIV, Volume 1, on handwashing at the end of a meal) The right hand and then the left has to be immersed before a meal: “and he should not dry them with his shirt, because it is harmful to the memory.” (Chapter XL)

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The demon Lilith, a succubus, attacking a man as he sleeps.

“Wisdom of the Sages” for today: “When a man is asleep the holy soul departs from his body, and the unclean spirit comes down upon him. When he rises from his sleep the evil spirit departs from his entire body excepting his fingers. From there the unclean spirit does not depart unless he spills water on them three times alternately. One is not permitted to walk four cubits without having his hands washed.” (Chapter II) A cubit is about 18 inches — so watch your step! This so-called “handwashing” is not for cleanliness, as previously noted, but a ritual in connection with dislodging demons the “Orthodox” or “pious” Jew may well spend the rest of the time invoking or inviting in.

Ritual Murder

Over the centuries, and dating from the time of the Pharisee historian Josephus, in the 1st Century, Jews have repeatedly been charged with “ritual murder”, that is, murder for purposes of paganistic black magic, charges always vehemently denied. Such denials are understandable, when one considers how loathsome such practices are.

Says the 1905 Jewish Encyclopedia: “It may be positively asserted that there is no Jewish ritual which prescribes the use of blood of any human being. Were there such a ritual … there would certainly be some reference to it in the colossal mass of halakic literature … ”

This is an evasion, because no one has accused Judaism of carrying all the bloody business of its demonism in the “halachah” or “legal” literature. Demonism belongs in the “Practical Cabala”, the “theurgic” or wonder-working literature, the manuscripts for which are copied hand to hand. Occasionally one is printed in occult works. Blood, blood, blood is through it all.

One of the many charges of ritual murder was in Russia, in 1912, when Mendel Beilis was accused of this crime of murdering for purposes of black magic. The American Jewish Committee succeeded in interesting journalists to such an extent “that the country was convinced of the infamous character of the charge.” Christian ministers of the USA were induced to send protests to Russia. These “Christian divines” whom the Committee inspired to protest to Russia “disavowed their belief in the atrocious charge.” (See Exhibit 228)

The 1905 Jewish Encyclopedia elaborately denies the “Blood Accusation,” but states:

“Of the alarmingly large number of ritual trials only a few of the more important and instructive can here be mentioned.” One hundred twenty-two are covered. Thirty-nine of these in one row bear dates in the 19th Century. These trials took place from Rumania, Prussia, Bohemia and Germany through to Russia, England and France.

Strange that so many court trials have been held for so many centuries in so many different countries without any foundation whatever except some groundless prejudice?

A reading of the section on “Superstition” in the Universal Jewish Encyclopedia will give a glimpse of occult practices of Judaism continuing today, foul practices such as “to fig,” Kapporah, and the like.

Rabbi Joshua Trachtenberg is cited as an authority as to his Jewish Magic and Superstition (Behrman’s Jewish Book House, Publishers, 1939). In it he seeks to erase the Ritual Murder charges of the centuries, referring to “the constant recurrence of child sacrifice in these trials and the importance of human blood in the witches’ ritual … the most distinguishing elements in the technique of the sorcerer and the witch, as disclosed to popular view by the campaign of the Church.” (page 9)

It is interesting to note that these occult practices are current. The late Dr. Dekker was at one time in the Communist movement, and told me of being a member of the same occult group with Communist Party Chief Earl Browder, for the purpose of “influencing individuals.”

Ancient Talmudic Satanic symbols in common use today by gentiles, not knowing what they are doing.

The publication Ritual Magic [E.M. Butler, Cambridge University Press, 1949] is a good complement to Trachtenberg’s Jewish Magic and Superstition and is a documented book which contains much material and some bloody manuscripts. It was authored by Professor E. M. Butler of Cambridge University (published by the University Press, 1949).

The vast scholarship, the documentation on this subject, are presented in a light hearted style not unmixed with awareness of the perils and the ghastly viciousness of the occult “arts” which translations of museum manuscripts must convey to any sane reader. So reference is made in the Butler book to a branch of this demon magic as belonging to an earlier age: “to the world of the Akkadian-Chaldean ‘Babylonian’ inscriptions and of the Graeco-Egyptian papyri animated by the belief that the gods could and would support the magician in his dealings with the demons, if properly invoked; and that by the use of certain mysterious and ineffable names as well as other spells, they could be forced to do so even against their will.

From the earliest times this extraordinary power was recognized as prone to abuse in the hands of ‘black’ magicians, but the Art itself was not only respectable, it was a high and holy one. Christianity altered all that, anathematizing magic …”

Murdering Children

No one with a grain of common decency could have anything but the utmost denunciation for murdering children in orgies of blood and obscenity. But the Jewish Talmud permits this, today, in the book of Sanhedrin, its supreme “repository” of the criminal law, justified as giving one’s “seed to Molech.”

The Biblical denunciations of the “abominations,” such as Molech and Baal worship, carry little color to the modern reader, who is ignorant of the black demonism, the bloody cruelty and unbridled perverted lust of paganism, nor do the Biblical writers of today enlighten us.

Soundly bedded in the Bible and ancient history is French historian Gustave Flaubert’s description of child sacrifice to the Baal Molech in Carthage, which had been founded by the Phoenicians. The Phoenician city, Tyre, trading center of the ancient World, was infamous for its Lesbianism, Sodomy and Child-burning black rites. Its total and permanent destruction, foretold by Ezekiel (Chapter 26 and 27), was fulfilled to the last detail after Alexander the Great sold 30,000 of its leading citizens into slavery, building a causeway out of the battered walls and towers Nebuchadnezzar had demolished.

Flaubert (who died in 1880) describes the thirst, the fear, of the Carthaginians:

“They had not despatched to Phoenicia their annual offering due to Tyrian Melkarth … . The gods were indignant with the Republic, and were, no doubt, about to prosecute their vengeance …

“All were feeble in comparison with Moloch the Destroyer … there was no pain great enough for the god, since he delighted in such as was of the most horrible description … He must, accordingly, be fully gratified — it was believed that an immolation by fire would purify Carthage. The ferocity of the people was predisposed towards it.

“The Ancients assembled … and when the pontiff of Moloch asked them whether they would consent to surrender their children … All successively bent their heads in approval … The decision was almost immediately known in Carthage, and lamentations resounded. The cries of the women might everywhere be heard; their husbands consoled them, or railed at them with remonstrances … Then … the priests of Moloch began their task. Men in black robes presented themselves in the houses … the servants of Moloch came and took the children away. Others themselves surrendered them stupidly. Then they were brought to the temple of Tanith, where the priestesses were charged with their amusement and support until the solemn day …

“Part of a wall in the temple of Moloch was thrown down in order to draw out the brazen god without touching the ashes of the altar. Then as soon as the Sun appeared the hierodules pushed it toward the square of Khamon.

“It moved backwards sliding upon cylinders; its shoulders overlapped the walls. No sooner did the Carthaginians see it in the distance than they speedily took to flight, for the Baal could be looked upon with impunity only when exercising his wrath.

[page 52] “A smell of aromatics spread through the streets. All the temples had just been opened simultaneously, and from them came forth tabernacles borne upon chariots, or upon litters carried by the pontiffs. Great plumes swayed at the corners of them, and rays were emitted from their slender pinnacles which terminated in balls of crystal, gold, silver or copper.

“These were the Canaanitish Baalim, offshoots of the supreme Baal. Melkarth’s pavilion, which was of fine purple, sheltered a petroleum flame; on Khamon’s, which was of hyacinith color, there rose an ivory phallus [Note: the male procreative symbol which distinguished the “high places” excoriated by the Bible] bordered with a circle of gems; between Eschmoun’s curtains, which were blue as the ether, a sleeping python formed a circle with his tail …

Then came all the inferior forms of the Divinity: Baal Samin, god of celestial space; Baal-Peor … Baal Zehoub … the Irabel of Liyba, the Adrammelech of Chaldaea, the Kijun of the Syrians; Decreto … crept on her fins, and the corpse of ‘Tammouz’ [sex-god whose fast is part of the Talmudic synagogue calendar today] was drawn along in the midst of a catafalque … In order to subdue the kings of the firmament to the Sun [the current Talmudic religion “Greets the Sun” periodically] … diversely colored metal stars were brandished at the end of long poles; and all were there, from the dark Nebo, the genius of Mercury, to the hideous Rahab, which is the constellation of the Crocodile.

The Abbadirs, stones which had fallen from the Moon [Note: New Moon days are celebrated in the synagogues monthly today with superstitious rites] were whirling in slings of silver thread; little loaves, representing the female form were borne on baskets by the priests of Ceres; others brought their fetishes and amulets.”

The Jewish idolaters of Jeremiah’s time used these same “sex loaves” and he bewailed the paganism of those whose “children gather wood and the fathers kindle the fire, and the women knead their dough to make cakes to the Queen of Heaven.” (Jer. 7:18) But when they had to flee into Egypt, and Jerusalem was leveled to the ground for their abominations, as foretold, and Jeremiah reproved them for the same worship of the sex-goddess, they replied that they would do as they pleased: because they had plenty when they did that and had had troubles since they quit.

“And … did we make her cakes to worship her, and pour our drink offerings unto her without our men?” (Jer. 44:18, 19) Then Jeremiah tells them that is just why they are in the trouble they are — because they did these things.

Concerning the pagan amulets mentioned by Flaubert, they have been used right to the present time by the Talmudic pagans “which say they are Jews.” (Rev. 2:9. See Exhibits 285, 286, and 287)

Continuing Flaubert’s description of the child sacrifices to Molech:

“The brazen statue continued to advance towards the square of Khamon. The rich, carrying scepters with emerald balls … the Ancients with diadems on their heads … masters of the finances, governors of provinces, sailors and the numerous horde employed at funerals, all with the insignia of their magistracies or the instruments of their calling, were making their way … At last the Baal arrived exactly in the Centre of the square.

His pontiffs arranged an enclosure with trellis-work to keep off the multitude … A picture is drawn of the various orders and their positions, their colorful array, “the necromancers all covered with tattooings and the shriekers in patched cloaks … and the Yidonim, who put the bone of a dead man into their mouths to learn the future. The priests of Ceres … were chanting a thesmophorion in the Megarian dialect. [Note: the festival in honor of female procreation of Thesmorphoria.]

“From time to time files of men arrived, completely naked, their arms outstretched, and all holding one another by the shoulders … they drew forth a hoarse and cavernous intonation; their eyes … shone thru the dust, and they swayed their bodies simultaneously, and at equal distances, as though they were all affected by a single movement. They were so frenzied that to restore order the hierodules compelled them, with blows of the stick, to lie flat on the ground, with their faces resting against the brass trellis work.”

A priest of the female procreation goddess Tanith enters and is resented as this is the celebration to honor the male sex-god, Moloch. He, “Schahabarim … owing to his mutilation … could take no part in the cult of Baal.” (Note: The priests of the female goddesses were castrated with “sacred swords” and their “privy member” thrown up against the statue of the goddess as an offering.)

Moses knew of these pagan rites and denounced them in the following terms:

“He that is wounded in the stones, or hath his privy member cut off, shall not enter into the congregation of the Lord.” (Deut. 23:1)

The Fire Burns for the Children

Continuing Flaubert:

“Meanwhile a fire of aloes, cedar, and laurel was burning between the legs of the colossus. The tips of its long wings dipped into the flame; the unguents with which it had been rubbed flowed like sweat over its brazen limbs.

“Around the circular flagstone on which its feet rested, the children, wrapped in black veils, formed a motionless circle … The rich, the Ancients, the women, the whole multitude, thronged behind the priests and on the terraces of the houses. The large painted stars revolved no longer; the tabernacles were set on the ground; and the fumes from the censers ascended perpendicularly …

“Many fainted; others became inert and petrified in their ecstasy. Infinite anguish weighed upon the breasts of the beholders … At last the High Priest of Moloch passed his left hand beneath the children’s veils, plucked a lock of hair from their foreheads and threw it upon the flames. Then the men in the red cloaks chanted the sacred hymn:

‘Homage to thee, Sun! King of two zones, self-generating Creator ‘ … their voices were lost in the outburst of instruments sounding simultaneously to drown the cries of the victims. The eightstringed scheminiths, the kinnors which had ten strings and the nebals which had twelve, grated, whistled, and thundered. Enormous leathern bags, bristling with pipes, made a shrill clashing noise; the tambourines, beaten with all the players’ might, resounded with heavy, rapid blows; and in spite of the fury of the clarions, the salsalim snapped like grasshoppers’ wings …

“The hierodules, with a long hook, opened the seven-storied compartments on the body of the Baal. They put meal into the highest, two turtle-doves into the second, an ape into the third, a ram into the fourth, a sheep into the fifth, and as no ox was to be had for the sixth, a tawny hide taken from the sanctuary was thrown into it. The seventh compartment yawned empty still … it was well to make trial of the arms of the god. Slender chainlets stretched from his fingers up to his shoulders and fell behind, where men by pulling them made the two hands rise to a level with the elbows, and come close together against the belly; they were moved several times in succession with little abrupt jerks.

“Then the instruments were still. The fire roared. An individual sacrifice was necessary, a perfectly voluntary oblation … Then the priests to encourage the people drew bodkins from their girdles and gashed their faces. [Note the description in I Kings 18:28 of the priests of Baal: “And they cried aloud, and cut themselves after their manner with knives and lancets, till the blood gushed upon them.”]

“The Devotees, who were stretched on the ground outside, were brought within the enclosure. A bundle of horrible irons was thrown to them, and each chose his own torture. They drove in spits between their breasts; they split their cheeks … then they twined their arms together, and surrounded the children in another large circle which widened and contracted in turns. They reached to the balustrade; they threw themselves back again, and then began once more, attracting the crowd to them by the dizziness of their motion with its accompanying blood and shrieks.”

The Moloch Sacrifice Climaxes

Returning to Flaubert’s description:

“By degrees people came into the end of the passages; they flung into the flames pearls, gold vases, cup, torches, all their wealth; the offerings became more numerous and more splendid.

“At last a man who tottered, a man pale and hideous with terror, thrust forth a child; then a little black mass was seen between the hands of the colossus, and sank into the dark opening. The priests bent over the edge of the great flagstone and a new song burst forth …

“The children ascended slowly, and as the smoke formed lofty eddies as it escaped … Not one stirred. Their wrist and ankles were tied, and the dark drapery prevented them from seeing anything and from being recognized …

“The brazen arms were working more quickly. They paused no longer. Every time that a child was placed in them the priests of Moloch spread out their hands upon him to burden him with the crimes of the people, vociferating:

Infants, carrying the crimes of the people, sacrificed to Moloch.

‘They are not men, but oxen!’ The devout exclaimed: ‘Lord! eat!’ and the priests of Proserpine complying through terror with the needs of Carthage, muttered the Eleusinian formula: ‘Pour out rain! bring forth!’

“The victims when scarcely at the edge of the opening, disappeared like a drop of water on a red-hot plate, and white smoke rose amid the great scarlet color. Nevertheless, the appetite of the god was not appeased. He ever wished for more. In order to furnish him with a larger supply, the victims were piled upon his hands with a big chain above them which kept them in their place.

Some devout persons had at the beginning wished to count them, to see whether their number corresponded with the days of the solar year, but others were brought, and it was impossible to distinguish them in the giddy motion of the horrible arms. This lasted a long, indefinite time until the evening. Then the partitions inside assumed a darker glow, and burning flesh might have been seen. Some even believed they could decry hair, limbs, and whole bodies.

“Night fell: clouds accumulated above the Baal. The funeral-pile, which was flameless now, formed a pyramid of coals up to his knees; completely red like a giant covered with blood, he looked, with his head thrown back, as though he were staggering beneath the weight of his intoxication.

“In proportion as the priests made haste, the frenzy of the people increased; as the number of victims was diminishing, some cried out to spare them, other that still more were needful. The walls, with their burden of people, seemed to be giving away beneath the howlings of terror and mystic voluptuousness. Then the faithful came into the passages, dragging their children, who clung to them; and they beat them in order to make them let go, and handed them over to the men in red. The instrument-players sometimes stopped through exhaustion; then the cries of the others might be heard, and the frizzling of the fat as it fell upon the coals.

“The henbane-drinkers crawled on all fours around the colossus, roaring like tigers; the Yidonim vaticinated, the Devotees sang with their cloven lips; the trellis work had been broken through, all wished for a share in the sacrifice: — fathers, whose children had died previously, cast their effigies, their playthings, their preserved bones into the fire.

“Some who had knives rushed upon the rest. They slaughtered one another. [Note: One is reminded here of Deuteronomy 14:1 “ye shall not cut yourselves.”] The hierodules took the fallen ashes at the edge of the flagstone in bronze fans, and cast them into the air that the sacrifice might be scattered over the town and even to the region of the stars.

“The loud noise and the great light had attracted the Barbarians* to the foot of the walls; they clung to the wreck of the helepolis to have a better view, and gazed open-mouthed in horror.” (“Salammbo,” Gustave Flaubert: born France: died 1880.)

LaCroix on Moloch

As to the same rites, LaCroix states:

“Moloch was represented under the figure of a man with the head of a calf … erected upon an immense oven, which [see Note 1 below] was lighted to consume at once the seven kinds of offerings. During this holocaust, the priests of Moloch kept up a terrible music, with sistrums and tambours, in order to stifle the cries of the victims.

Then took place that infamy cursed by the God of Israel: the Molochites abandoned themselves to practices worthy of the land of Onan (masturbation] and, inspired by the rhythmic sound of the musical instruments, writhed about the incandescent statue, which appeared red thru the smoke; and they gave forth frenzied cries as, in accordance with the Biblical expression, they gave their seed to Moloch.” (“History of Prostitution,” by Paul LaCroix, French author and historian; 1806-84)

Judaism Permits Child Sacrifices to Moloch

The whole Bible is full of and condemns the bloody business of pagan demonology, including Baal worship with its self-cutting with knives and Moloch worship with child sacrifice. Both are condoned or permitted by the modern Jewish Babylonian Talmud.

Every form of ancient paganism decried by the Bible may be found under the “whited sepulchre” of so-called “Judaism,” which is actually Pharisee paganism.

“Christian divines,” now, as formerly, would do well to read up on what the Bible condemns, and find those pagan murder practices have not disappeared from the Earth, nor from the “synagogue of Satan.”

Modern sacrifice to Moloch as allowed by the Babylonian Talmud

Burning children to the demon Moloch is permitted today by the supreme legal authority of the so-called “Jewish” religion, which is the Babylonian Talmud, and, in particular, the Talmud book of Sanhedrin, Folios 64a-64b. Remember, the book of Sanhedrin is, according to its Introduction in the Soncino English translation of 1935, the “chief repository of the criminal law of the Talmud.” (See Exhibit 43)

To justify child sacrifices to Moloch, the Talmud once again cites Scripture, which clearly condemns such pagan practice, and then reverses the clear meaning of the Scripture with hairsplitting “exceptions” to justify these sacrifices. (See Exhibits 66, 67, 68, and 69)

Thus, as Christ put it to the Pharisees, you make the “commandment of God of none effect. Ye hypocrites! Well did Esaias [Isaiah] prophecy of you, saying, This people draw nigh unto me with their mouth, and honoureth me with their lips; but their heart is far from me. But in vain do they worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men.” (Matt. 15:7) Christ also referred to Isaiah 29:13. Isaiah well knew the breed of Satanists who used the Bible to destroy it.

The “Mishna” of the Sanhedrin (Exhibit 66) sets out to make supposedly clear orders of Moses against burning or causing to be burned any child to Moloch by (1) handing the child to Moloch and (2) causing the child to be burned.

But, note the “explanation” to the Talmudic Mishna, which states (Exhibit 66): “He who gives of his seed to Molech incurs no punishment unless he delivers it to Moloch” (1) “and causes it to pass through the fire” (2). “If he gave it to Moloch but he did not cause it to pass through the fire, or the reverse” (i.e. caused his child to pass through the fire, but did not give it to Moloch) “he incurs no penalty unless he does both.”

At this point, does it really matter whether an innocent child has been burned in fire and also “given to Moloch” when its murder by fire is condoned if the latter proviso is excluded?

In a footnote to the same Talmud “Mishna” reference (Exhibit No. 66), it is “explained:”

“(5) As two separate offenses, proving that giving one’s seed to Moloch is not idolatry.” What foul idolatry!

The same Talmud section (see Exhibit 67) subverts the Mishna exception “unless he gives it to Moloch” further to: “Punishment is not incurred unless he delivers his seed to the acolytes of Moloch.” Thus, if one delivers his own child into the fire, for death, and to Moloch, there would be “no punishment.”

A further “explanatory footnote” says: “He explains this to be the meaning of the Mishna unless he gives it to Moloch (5). This proves that the offense consists of two parts; (1) formal delivery to the priests, and (2) causing the seed to pass through the fire.” (Exhibit 67)

The same Talmud section (Exhibit 69) includes the repetitional statement that: “the service of Moloch … is not included in general idolatry.” (Note: Reversing the chief idolatrous practice denounced by the Bible!) In Leviticus XX, 2 it is stated: “And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying: … Whosoever he be of the children of Israel, or of the strangers that sojourn in Israel that giveth any of his seed to Molech … Then treatment of a murderer is demanded: “He shall surely be put to death.”

As to this Biblical prohibition, the Talmud is a masterpiece of satanism stating (Exhibit 68): “If one caused all his seed to pass through the fire to Molech, he is exempt, because it is written, ‘of thy seed’ implying, but not all thy seed.” In footnote 4 the Biblical citation as authority is given as the Leviticus reference referred to above.

Thus, the Talmud “nullifies” the word of God, reversing it while giving it as authority, to permit murdering one’s child in the service of Molech! This cannot be from ignorance of God’s word, clearly cited, and is nothing but sheer blasphemy.

Note 1: At the time referred to by Flaubert, Carthage was under siege from unpaid Barbarians enlisted by Carthage in its war with Rome, as mercenaries, and they were out of funds, water. etc. at the time.

 


Blood Sacrifice…… this intense ritual has been around forever and still exists today in many parts of the world.

  • There has always been cultures throughout history that have made sacrifice to their God Deities or idols. All in order to please them and to gain favor from them.
  • There were many times throughout the Bible that sacrificial offerings were made to God. In most cases a virgin lamb was used. You will note that in most animal sacrifices the animal is to be virgin. This is because it is pure. You will also note that God only found blood sacrifice pleasing.
  • We have the story of Cain and Abel where Abel used blood sacrifice and found the favor of God and Cain used vegetables and did not find favor with God so Cain got jealous and killed Abel.
  • We have Abraham in the Bible who was asked to sacrifice his firstborn  son to God. Replacing animal life for human life. But then God stopped him for he was only testing him.
  • Let’s face it… the Bible is full of Blood Sacrifice and killing all in the name of God. Makes you wonder doesn’t it?
  • We have the Aztecs who were very big on Human and animal sacrifice. It was an integral part of their Religion. They had many Blood thirsty Gods that needed to be pleased. As they saw it, the offering of blood through human sacrifice ensured the perpetuation of the universe. Spanish observers found the practice utterly revolting for Aztecs would take their victims… make them lay perfectly still while the High Priest took a stone knife and cut out their heart.
  • The Aztec priests were also into self mutilation. For instance, cutting their own genitalia and worst of all they would take a rope and embed it with large thorns. Then they would pierce their tongue and thread the thorn embedded rope through the tongue. The likes would have to be such an excruciating pain that they would leave their bodies and travel to other dimensions. Similar to the american Indians who would do piercing to achieve OBE’s. Reference the movie "A man called Horse".
  • Now in the ancient days the ultimate sacrifice was to be that of a virgin young boy. Even today human sacrifice goes on, but only in the most secretive places. There are some Devil worshipers (not Satanists) that practice the art. I myself have seen on video their practice of cutting out the internal organs of a human and then rolling around in the blood and drinking it which then led to sexual orgies. I can only add my opinion to say that they are sick for they usually use kidnapped children and runaways. This is something that the Police do not talk about because they are afraid of it. Most children that disappear usually end up this way and not in the hands of a molester. If the Law Enforcement weren’t so chicken shit they would take care of the problem and also inform the public
  • Now the good stuff… sacrifice for conjuring of Demonic Beings. Now for the Truly brave Sorcerer, he will use his own blood which I myself am accustom to. But the norm is to use that of an animal. For instance, using white doves or chickens. There are many different animals that can be used according to who you are conjuring up. Remember if they are virgin animals, it is all the more pleasing to the Entity.
  • Why do you need to use blood? Because blood is life… it has an energy… a life force. So Demons are attracted to it. Plus it gives them some substance to take some form. If only you could see the demons attracted to the fresh corpses of the newly killed on the battlefield in times of war.
  • Now… when you sacrifice an animal and pour the blood into the Triangle of Solomon… it has only a life force time of about fifteen minutes. Once the life force is exhausted the Entity will probably leave. You can take note of a similar situation when Crowley conjured the Mighty Demon "Chorozon" in the desert. You will also take note that Crowley’s partner was almost killed when attacked by the Demon and many believe that this conjuring of Chorozon led to Crowley’s eventual death. This is because Crowley let the Demon take possession of his body so it could talk through him.
  • Now their are many of you who would never think of doing such a thing and that is fine. For you like many others may use Incense. For it is also pleasing to the entities and will give them something to help them take form.
  • One last note… this is not to encourage you to do such things… only to inform you! Head my words… Blood sacrifice is very dangerous, especially for the inexperienced Sorcerer!!! You will probably end up the victim yourself by the hands of the Entity that you conjured up!
  • Remember… never torture an animal!
  • Those of you whom like to go to into the woods and kill black cats because you think you are a Devil worshiper or that it is the cool thing to do on Halloween… I HOPE YOU DIE A VIOLENT DEATH! MAY THE BLACKEST OF DARKNESS SMITE YOU DOWN INTO THE GROUND!

 


Using Hallucinogens for Spiritual Purposes
by Special Guest Writer….. Krystle Cole of  www.NeuroSoup.com
April 13, 2009
    During the peak of one of my first LSD trips I came to the realization that all the knowledge of the universe was at my fingertips. So, I seized the moment and asked myself some the universal questions I had always wondered about.
I started with, "Why are we all here?"
And the answer came into my head as one word, "LOVE."
Then I asked myself, "What is the purpose of this life?"
And again, instantly I knew it was "LOVE."
I asked yet another question, "Who or what created us?"
And again "LOVE" cascaded throughout my being.
    As you can begin to see, hallucinogens (or entheogens, as many of us like to call them) have helped shape, or unshape, my psyche and attitudes toward life. Before I used entheogens, I was not very interested in spirituality or discovering the answers to any of my questions about the universe. This is because I was the type of person that needed to see it, in order to believe it. I figured that there was really no point in trying to figure it all out, because no one could really ever know until they died.
    Entheogens were a complete wake-up call for me; they totally changed my perspective on the nature of reality. They enabled me to see it, so to speak. By far, my entheogenic journeys were the peak experiences of my life – I wouldn’t trade them for any other experience in the world.
    I am not alone in this belief; during a study at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institution, researchers gave 36 volunteers psilocybin, the active constituent in hallucinogenic mushrooms. Two-thirds of the participants described the effects of psilocybin as among the five most meaningful experiences of their lives (Griffiths et al., 2006).
Overview of Spiritual Use
Entheogens have been used as a spiritual tool for exploring consciousness by many different cultures throughout history.  Some examples are the kykeon of Eleusis, the soma of the Rg Veda, the peyote of the Native American church, the teonanácatl of the Aztecs, and the ayahuasca or hoasca of the Santo Daime and União do Vegetal.
    The word entheogen has a very spiritual connotation, unlike many of the other words used to describe psychedelic or hallucinogenic drugs. Entheogens, like LSD, DMT and mescaline, can help you understand the timeless divinity that links us all together.
The word entheogen was originally created by Carl A. P. Ruck, Jeremy Bigwood, Danny Staples, Jonathan Ott, and R. Gordon Wasson (1979). Here is what they wrote about its meaning:
All languages grow together with the peoples who speak them, borrowing or inventing terms to keep pace with what is new and retiring others when they are no longer needed. When the recent surge of recreational use of so-called "hallucinogenic" or "psychedelic" drugs first came to popular attention in the early 1960s, it was commonly viewed with suspicion and associated with the behavior of deviant or revolutionary groups….
Out of the many words proposed to describe this unique class of drugs only a few have survived in current usage. It is the contention of the authors who have subscribed their names to this article that none of these terms really deserve greater longevity if our language is not to perpetuate the misunderstandings of the past….
[N]ot only is "psychedelic" an incorrect verbal formation, but it has become so invested with connotations of the pop-culture of the 1960s that it is incongruous to speak of a shaman’s taking a "psychedelic" drug.
We, therefore, propose a new term that would be appropriate for describing states of shamanic and ecstatic possession induced by ingestion of mind-altering drugs. In Greek the word entheos means literally "god (theos) within," and was used to describe the condition that follows when one is inspired and possessed by the god that has entered one’s body. It was applied to prophetic seizures, erotic passion and artistic creation, as well as to those religious rites in which mystical states were experienced through the ingestion of substances that were transubstantial with the deity. In combination with the Greek root gen-, which denotes the action of "becoming," this word results in the term that we are proposing: entheogen.
Spiritual Use of DMT
DMT, or dimethyltryptamine, is one example of an entheogen that has been used in a spiritual setting for millennia. As previously mentioned, two South American churches, the Santo Daime and União do Vegetal, use ayahuasca, or hoasca, as their sacrament. This is a tea made from boiled plants. One plant contains DMT and another plant contains MAOIs, or monoamine oxidase inhibitors. DMT is only orally active when it is combined with an MAOI. Otherwise DMT can be insufflated, smoked, injected, or administered anally without an MAOI.
Despite the fact that DMT is classified as a Schedule I drug, the United States Supreme Court still recognized its spiritual significance. In the case of Gonzales v. O Centro Espirita Beneficente União do Vegetal, the Supreme Court heard arguments on November 1, 2005 and unanimously ruled in February 2006 that the U.S. Federal Government must allow the União do Vegetal to import and consume ayahuasca for religious ceremonies under the 1993 Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Even our own Supreme Court recognizes the spiritual significance of these substances.

Demon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For other uses, see Demon (disambiguation).

St. Anthony plagued by demons, as imagined by Martin Schongauer, in the 1480s.

In religion and mythology, occultism and folklore, a demon (or daemon, daimon; from Greek δαίμων daimôn) is a supernatural being that is generally described as a malevolent spirit; however, the original neutral connotation of the Greek word daimon does not carry the negative one that was later projected onto it, as Christianity spread.

In Ancient Near Eastern religions as well as in the derived Abrahamic traditions, including ancient and medieval Christian demonology, a demon is considered an "unclean spirit" which may cause demonic possession, to be addressed with an act of exorcism. In Western occultism and Renaissance magic, which grew out of an amalgamation of pagan Greco-Roman, Jewish and Christian tradition[citation needed], a demon is considered a spiritual entity that may be conjured and controlled. Many of the demons in literature were once fallen angels, however there are many that say that they are born-forged from Hellitself.[citation needed]

Contents

[hide]

[edit]Terminology

Further information: Agathodaemon, Cacodemon, Daimonic, and Eudaimonia

Ancient Greek δαίμων daimōn is a word for "spirit" or "divine power", much like the Latin genius or numen. The Merriam-Webster dictionary gives the etymology of the Greek word as from the verb daiesthai "to divide, distribute." The Greek conception of a δαίμων notably appears in the works of Plato, where it describes the divine inspiration of Socrates. To distinguish the classical Greek concept from its later Christian interpretation, it is usually anglicized as either daemon or daimon rather than demon.

The Greek term does not have any connotations of evil or malevolence. In fact, εὐδαιμονία, literally "good-spiritedness", is a term for "happiness". The term first acquired its now-current evil connotations in the Septuagint translation of the Hebrew Bible, informed by the mythology of the ancient Semitic religions. This connotation was inherited by the Koine text of the New Testament. The medieval and neo-medieval conception of a "demon" in Western civilization (see the Medieval grimoire called the Ars Goetia) derives seamlessly from the ambient popular culture of Late (Roman) Antiquity. Greco-Roman concepts of daemons that passed into Christian culture are discussed in the entry daemon, though it should be duly noted that the term referred only to a spiritual force, not a malevolent supernatural being. The Hellenistic "daemon" eventually came to include many Semitic and Near Eastern gods as evaluated by Christianity.

The supposed existence of demons is an important concept in many modern religions[who?] and occultist traditions. In some present-day cultures, demons are still feared in popular superstition, largely due to their alleged power to possess living creatures. In the contemporary Western occultist tradition (perhaps epitomized by the work of Aleister Crowley), a demon, such as Choronzon, the "Demon of the Abyss", is a useful metaphor for certain inner psychological processes ("inner demons"), though some may also regard it as an objectively real phenomenon. Some scholars[1] believe that large portions of the demonology (see Asmodai) of Judaism, a key influence on Christianity and Islam, originated in Zoroastrianism, and were transferred to Judaism during the Persian era.

[edit]Psychological archetype

Psychologist Wilhelm Wundt remarks that "among the activities attributed by myths all over the world to demons, the harmful predominate, so that in popular belief bad demons are clearly older than good ones."[2] Sigmund Freud develops on this idea and claims that the concept of demons was derived from the important relation of the living to the dead: "The fact that demons are always regarded as the spirits of those who have died recently shows better than anything the influence of mourning on the origin of the belief in demons."

M. Scott Peck, an American psychiatrist, wrote two books on the subject, People of the Lie: The Hope For Healing Human Evil[3] and Glimpses of the Devil: A Psychiatrist’s Personal Accounts of Possession, Exorcism, and Redemption.[4]

Peck describes in some detail several cases involving his patients. In People of the Lie: The Hope For Healing Human Evil he gives some identifying characteristics for evil persons whom he classifies as having a character disorder. In Glimpses of the Devil, A Psychiatrist’s Personal Accounts of Possession, Exorcism, and Redemption Peck goes into significant detail describing how he became interested in exorcism in order to debunk the "myth" of possession by evil spirits–only to be convinced otherwise after encountering two cases which did not fit into any category known to psychology or psychiatry. Peck came to the conclusion that possession was a rare phenomenon related to evil. Possessed people are not actually evil; they are doing battle with the forces of evil.[5] His observations on these cases are listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (IV) of the American Psychiatric Association.[6]

Although Peck’s earlier work was met with widespread popular acceptance, his work on the topics of evil and possession has generated significant debate and derision. Much was made of his association with (and admiration for) the controversial Malachi Martin, a Roman Catholic priest and a former Jesuit, despite the fact that Peck consistently called Martin a liar and manipulator.[6][7] Other criticisms leveled against Peck include misdiagnoses based upon a lack of knowledge regarding dissociative identity disorder (formerly known as multiple personality disorder), and a claim that he had transgressed the boundaries of professional ethics by attempting to persuade his patients into accepting Christianity.[6]

[edit]By tradition

 

Ancient Near East
Mesopotamia

In Chaldean mythology the seven evil deities were known as shedu, meaning storm-demons. They were represented in winged bull form, derived from the colossal bulls used as protective genii of royal palaces, the name "shed" assumed also the meaning of a propitious genius in Babylonian magic literature.[8]

It was from Chaldea that the name "shedu" came to the Israelites, and so the writers of the Tanach applied the word as a dylogism to the Canaanite deities in the two passages quoted. But they also spoke of "the destroyer" (Exodus xii. 23) as a demon whose malignant effect upon the houses of the Israelites was to be warded off by the blood of the paschal sacrifice sprinkled upon the lintel and the door-post (a corresponding pagan talisman is mentioned in Isaiah lvii. 8). In II Samuel xxiv; 16 and II Chronicles xxi. 15 the pestilence-dealing demon is called "the destroying angel" (compare "the angel of the Lord" in II Kings xix. 35; Isaiah xxxvii. 36), because, although they are demons, these "evil messengers" (Psalms lxxviii. 49; A. V. "evil angels") do only the bidding of God; they are the agents of His divine wrath.

There are indications that popular Hebrew mythology ascribed to the demons a certain independence, a malevolent character of their own, because they are believed to come forth, not from the heavenly abode of God, but from the nether world.[9]

Hebrew demons were workers of harm. To them were ascribed the various diseases, particularly such as affect the brain and the inner parts. Hence there was a fear of "Shabriri" (lit. "dazzling glare"), the demon of blindness, who rests on uncovered water at night and strikes those with blindness who drink of it;[10] also mentioned were the spirit of catalepsy and the spirit of headache, the demon of epilepsy, and the spirit of nightmare.

These demons were supposed to enter the body and cause the disease while overwhelming or "seizing" the victim (hence "seizure"). To cure such diseases it was necessary to draw out the evil demons by certain incantations and talismanic performances, in which the Essenes excelled. Josephus, who speaks of demons as "spirits of the wicked which enter into men that are alive and kill them", but which can be driven out by a certain root,[11] witnessed such a performance in the presence of the Emperor Vespasian,[12] and ascribed its origin to King Solomon.

Ancient Arabia

Pre-Islamic mythology does not discriminate between gods and demons. The jinn are considered as divinities of inferior rank, having many human attributes: they eat, drink, and procreate their kind, sometimes in conjunction with human beings. The jinn smell and lick things, and have a liking for remnants of food. In eating they use the left hand. Usually they haunt waste and deserted places, especially the thickets where wild beasts gather. Cemeteries and dirty places are also favorite abodes. When appearing to man, jinn sometimes assume the forms of beasts and sometimes those of men.

Generally, jinn are peaceable and well disposed toward men. Many a pre-Islamic poet was believed to have been inspired by good jinn, but there are also evil jinn, who contrive to injure men.

Hebrew Bible

Those in the Hebrew Bible are of two classes, the se’irim and the shedim. The se’irim ("hairy beings"), to which some Israelites offered sacrifices in the open fields, are satyr-like creatures, described as dancing in the wilderness,[13] and which are identical with the jinn, such as Dantalion, the 71st spirit of Solomon. (But compare the completely European woodwose.) Possibly to the same class belongs Azazel, the goat-like demons of the wilderness,[14] probably the chief of the se’irim, and Lilith.[15] Possibly "the roes and hinds of the field", by which Shulamit conjures the daughters of Jerusalem to bring her back to her lover,[16] are faunlike spirits similar to the se’irim, though of a harmless nature.

The evil spirit that troubled Saul (I Samuel 16:14 et seq.) may have been a demon[citation needed], though the Masoretic text tells us that the spirit was sent by God.

Some benevolent shedim were used in kabbalistic ceremonies (as with the golem of Rabbi Yehuda Loevy), and malevolent shedim (mazikin, from the root meaning "to damage") were often creedited with possession. Similarly, a shed might inhabit an otherwise inanimate statue.

Judaism

Jewish demonology

In some rabbinic sources, the demons were believed to be under the dominion of a king or chief, either Asmodai [17] or, in the older Haggadah, Samael ("the angel of death"), who kills by his deadly poison, and is called "chief of the devils". Occasionally a demon is called "satan": "Stand not in the way of an ox when coming from the pasture, for Satan dances between his horns".[18]

Demonology never became an essential feature of Jewish theology[citation needed]. The reality of demons was never questioned by the Talmudists and late rabbis; most accepted their existence as a fact. Nor did most of the medieval thinkers question their reality. Only rationalists like Maimonides and Abraham ibn Ezra, clearly denied their existence. Their point of view eventually became the mainstream Jewish understanding.

Rabbinical demonology has three classes of demons, though they are scarcely separable one from another. There were the shedim, the mazziḳim ("harmers"), and the ruḥin ("spirits"). Besides these there were lilin ("night spirits"), ṭelane ("shade", or "evening spirits"), ṭiharire ("midday spirits"), and ẓafrire ("morning spirits"), as well as the "demons that bring famine" and "such as cause storm and earthquake" (Targ. Yer. to Deuteronomy xxxii. 24 and Numbers vi. 24; Targ. to Cant. iii. 8, iv. 6; Eccl. ii. 5; Ps. xci. 5, 6.)[19]

Christian demonology

Christian demonology

"Demon" has a number of meanings, all related to the idea of a spirit that inhabited a place, or that accompanied a person. Whether such a daemon was benevolent or malevolent, the Greek word meant something different from the later medieval notions of ‘demon’, and scholars debate the time in which first century usage by Jews and Christians in its original Greek sense became transformed to the later medieval sense. Some denominations asserting Christian faith also include, exclusively or otherwise,fallen angels as de facto demons; this definition also covers the "sons of God" described in Genesis who abandoned their posts in heaven to mate with human women on Earth before the Deluge.[20]

In the Gospel of Mark, Jesus casts out many demons, or evil spirits, from those who are afflicted with various ailments. Jesus is far superior to the power of demons over the beings that they inhabit, and he is able to free these victims by commanding and casting out the demons, by binding them, and forbidding them to return. Jesus also lends this power to some of his disciples, who rejoice at their new found ability to cast out all demons.[21]

By way of contrast, in the book of Acts a group of Judaistic exorcists known as the sons of Sceva try to cast out a very powerful spirit without believing in or knowing Jesus, but fail with disastrous consequences. However Jesus himself never fails to vanquish a demon, no matter how powerful (see the account of the demon-possessed man at Gerasim), and even defeats Satan in the wilderness (see Gospel of Matthew).

There is a description in the Book of Revelation 12:7-17 of a battle between God’s army and Satan’s followers, and their subsequent expulsion from Heaven to Earth to persecute humans — although this event is related as being foretold and taking place in the future. In Luke 10:18 it is mentioned that a power granted by Jesus to cast out demons made Satan "fall like lightning from heaven."

Augustine of Hippo‘s reading of Plotinus, in City of God (ch.11) is ambiguous as to whether daemons had become ‘demonized’ by the early 5th century:

"He [Plotinus] also states that the blessed are called in Greek eudaimones, because they are good souls, that is to say, good demons, confirming his opinion that the souls of men are demons.[22]

The contemporary Roman Catholic Church unequivocally teaches that angels and demons are real personal beings, not just symbolic devices. The Catholic Church has a cadre of officially sanctioned exorcists which perform many exorcisms each year. The exorcists of the Catholic Church teach that demons attack humans continually but that afflicted persons can be effectively healed and protected either by the formal rite of exorcism, authorized to be performed only by bishops and those they designate, or by prayers of deliverance which any Christian can offer for themselves or others.[23]

Building upon the few references to daemons in the New Testament, especially the visionary poetry of the Apocalypse of John, Christian writers of apocrypha from the 2nd century onwards created a more complicated tapestry of beliefs about "demons" that was largely independent of Christian scripture.

At various times in Christian history, attempts have been made to classify these beings according to various proposed demonic hierarchies.

According to most Christian demonology demons will be eternally punished and never reconciled with God. Other theories postulate a Universal reconciliation, in which Satan, the fallen angels, and the souls of the dead that were condemned to Hell are reconciled with God. This doctrine is today often associated with the Unification Church. Origen, Jerome and Gregory of Nyssa also mentioned this possibility.

In contemporary Christianity, demons are generally considered to be angels who fell from grace by rebelling against God. However, other schools of thought in Christianity or Judaism teach that demons, or evil spirits, are a result of the sexual relationships between fallen angels and human women. When these hybrids (Nephilim) died they left behind disembodied spirits that "roam the earth in search of rest" (Luke 11:24). Many non-canonical historical texts describe in detail these unions and the consequences thereof. This belief is repeated in other major ancient religions and mythologies. Christians who reject this view do so by ascribing the description of "Sons of God" in Genesis 6 to be the sons of Seth (one of Adam’s sons).

There are some who say that the sin of the angels was pride and disobedience, these being the sins that caused Satan’s downfall (Ezek. 28). If this be the true view, then we are to understand the words, "estate" or "principality" in Deuteronomy 32:8 and Jude 6 ("And the angels which kept not their first estate, but left their own habitation, he hath reserved in everlasting chains under darkness unto the judgment of the great day.") as indicating that instead of being satisfied with the dignity once for all assigned to them under the Son of God, they aspired higher….

Islam

See also: Islamic teaching about the Devil and Islamic creationism

Islam recognizes the existence of the jinn. Jinns are not the "genies" of modern lore, and they are not all evil, as demons are described in Christianity, but as creatures that co-exist with humans. In Islam the evil jinns are referred to as the shayātīn, or devils, and Iblis (Satan) is their chief. Iblis was the first Jinn who disobeyed Allah. According to Islam, the jinn are made from the fire (whereas angels are made from light and mankind is made from altered clay).

According to the Qur’an, Iblis was once a pious servant of Allah, but when Allah created Adam from clay, Iblis became very jealous, and arrogant and disobeyed Allah.

Adam was the first man, and man was the greatest creation of Allah. Iblis could not stand this, and refused to acknowledge a creature made of "dirt" (man). Allah condemned Iblis to be punished after death eternally in the hellfire. Allah had created hell.

Iblis asked Allah if he may live to the last day and have the ability to mislead mankind and jinns, Allah said that Iblis may only mislead those whom have forsaken Allah. Iblis then turned himself into the Devil and had the powers of trickery.

Adam and Eve (Hawwa in Arabic) were both together misled by Iblis into eating the forbidden fruit, and consequently fell from the garden of Eden to Earth.

The word "genie" comes from the French ‘génie’ for genius used in translations of Arabic text and only sounds coincidentally like the Arabic jinn. This is not surprising considering the story of `Alā’ ad-Dīn, (anglicized as Aladdin), passed through Arabian merchants en route to Europe.

Hinduism

Hindu mythology include numerous varieties of spirits that might be classified as demons, including Vetalas, Yakshas, Bhutas and Pishachas. Often Rakshasas and Asuras are mistakenly taken to mean demons.

Asuras

Originally, Asura, in the earliest hymns of the Rig Veda, meant any supernatural spirit, both good and bad. Since the /s/ of the Indic linguistic branch is cognate with the /h/ of the Early Iranian languages, the word Asura, representing a category of celestial beings, became the word Ahura (Mazda), the Supreme God of the monotheistic Zoroastrians. Ancient Hinduism tells that Devas and Asuras are half-brothers, sons of the same father Kasyapa; but some of the devas, like Varuna, are also named Asuras. But much later at puranic age Asura (also Rakshasa) came to exclusively mean any of a race of anthropomorphic, powerful, possibly evil beings. All words such as Asura, Daitya (lit., sons of the mother "Diti"), Rakshasa (lit. from "harm to be guarded against") are incorrectly translated into English as demon. A dominant depiction of Asuras is someone who is in constant battle with devas, their half-brothers, to establish supremacy and to secure immortality[citation needed]. Both asuras and devas are as much bound by their karmas as humans[citation needed]. Asuras do accept and worship the Gods, particularly the Hindu triumvirate; some of the rakshasas like Ravana and Mahabali are exemplary devotees. Often the strife between the asuras and the devas is simply a political one: devas are the ordained maintainers of the realms with power (and immortality) accorded to them by the gods and asuras ever strive to attain both. Asuras usually attain or enhance their supernatural powers through penance to gods and waging war on devas using powers thus attained. Unlike Christian notion of demons, asuras are not the cause of the evil and unhappiness in mankind (unhappiness in humans, according to Hinduism is by one’s own actions (Karma) and/or due to the continued ignorance of Brahman, the unchanging reality. Asuras, if any, are cogs in the wheel of Karma); they are not fundamentally against the Gods, nor do they tempt humans to fall. In fact, asuras, much like devas, do worship the Gods of Hinduism: many Asuras are said to have been granted boons from one of the members of the Hindu trinity, viz., Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva when the latter had been appeased from their penances. This is markedly different from the traditional Western notions of demons as a rival army of God. In Hindu mythology, pious, highly enlightened asuras, like Prahlada and Vibheeshana, are not at all uncommon. Prahlada even said to have secured enlightenment to his entire lineage (of asuras). All Asuras, unlike the devas, are said to have born mortals (though they ever strive to become immortal). Many people metaphorically interpret asuras as manifestations of the ignoble passions in human mind and as a symbolic device. There were also cases of power-hungry asuras challenging various aspects of Gods, but only to be defeated eventually and seek forgiveness—see Surapadman, Narakasura.

Evil spirits

Hinduism advocates the theory of reincarnation and transmigration of souls according to one’s Karma. Souls (Atman) of the dead are adjudged by the Yama and are accorded various purging punishments before being reborn. Humans that have committed extraordinary wrongs are condemned to roam as lonely, often evil, spirits for a length of time before being reborn. Many kinds of such spirits (Vetalas, Pishachas, Bhūta) are recognized in the later Hindu texts. These beings, in a limited sense, can be called demons.

Bahá’í Faith

In the Bahá’í Faith, demons are not regarded as independent evil spirits as they are in some faiths. All evil spirits described in various faith traditions such as satan, fallen angels, demons and jinns are metaphors for the base character traits a human being may acquire and manifest when he turns away from God and follows his lower nature. Belief in the existence of ghosts and earthbound spirits is rejected and considered to be the product of superstition.[24]

 

LIST OF DEMONS

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

  • Haagenti (Christian demonology)
  • Halphas (Christian demonology)
  • Haures (Christian demonology)
  • Humbaba (Sumerian mythology, Akkadian mythology)

I

  • Ifrit (Islamic mythology)
  • Incubus (Christian demonology, Chaldean mythology, Jewish folklore)
  • Ipos (Christian demonology)
  • Iblis (Islamic mythology)

J

K

L

M

N

O

  • Obizoth (Christian demonology)
  • Onoskelis (Greek mythology)
  • Oray (Christian demonology)
  • Orcus (Roman mythology)
  • Oriax (Christian demonology)
  • Orobas (Christian demonology)
  • Ose (Christian demonology)
  • Oni (Japanese demonology)

P

Q

R

  • Rahab (Jewish folklore)
  • Rahovart (European folklore)
  • Raiju (Japanese mythology)
  • Rakshasa (Hindu mythology)
  • Rangda (Balinese mythology)
  • Raum (Christian demonology)
  • Ravana (Hindu mythology – also seen by some Hindus as an aspect of the God Shiva)
  • Ronove (Christian demonology)
  • Rosier (Christian demonology)
  • Rumjal (Jewish demonology)
  • Rusalka (Slavic mythology)

S

  • Sabnock (Christian demonology)
  • Sallos (Christian demonology)
  • Salpsan, Satan’s son (Apocryphal Gospel of Bartholomew)
  • Samael (Jewish demonology)
  • Satan (Jewish demonology, Christian demonology, Islamic mythology)
  • Satanachia (Christian demonology)
  • Scox (Christian demonology)
  • Seere (Christian demonology)
  • Semyazza (Jewish demonology)
  • Set (Egyptian mythology during the Second Intermediate Period)
  • Shaitan (Islamic mythology)
  • Shax (Christian demonology)
  • Shedim (Jewish folklore)
  • Shezmu (Egyptian mythology)
  • Sidragasum (Christian demonology)
  • Sitri (Christian demonology)
  • Stheno (Greek mythology)
  • Stolas (Christian demonology)
  • Stuhać (Slavic mythology)
  • Succubus (Sumerian mythology, Akkadian mythology, Jewish folklore, Christian demonology)
  • Surgat (Christian demonology)

T

U

  • Ukobach (Christian demonology)
  • Utukku (Akkadian mythology – but could be good or evil in Sumerian mythology)

V

W

X

  • Xaphan (Christian demonology)

Y

Z

  • Zaebos (Christian demonology)
  • Zagan (Christian demonology)
  • Zalambur (Islamic mythology)
  • Zepar (Christian demonology)
  • Zmeu (Romanian folklore)
  • Zin (West African folklore)
  • Ziz (Jewish demonology)
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