Officer for NYPD secretly records colleagues and superiors for over a year, exposes mass corruption!

Two years ago, a police officer in a Brooklyn precinct became gravely concerned about how the public was being served. To document his concerns, he began carrying around a digital sound recorder, secretly recording his colleagues and superiors.
He recorded precinct roll calls. He recorded his precinct commander and other supervisors. He recorded street encounters. He recorded small talk and stationhouse banter. In all, he surreptitiously collected hundreds of hours of cops talking about their jobs.
They reveal that precinct bosses threaten street cops if they don’t make their quotas of arrests and stop-and-frisks, but also tell them not to take certain robbery reports in order to manipulate crime statistics. The tapes also refer to command officers calling crime victims directly to intimidate them about their complaints.
As a result, the tapes show, the rank-and-file NYPD street cop experiences enormous pressure in a strange catch-22: He or she is expected to maintain high "activity"—including stop-and-frisks—but, paradoxically, to record fewer actual crimes
The tapes also reveal the locker-room environment at the precinct. On a recording made in September, the subject being discussed at roll call is stationhouse graffiti (done by the cops themselves) and something called "cocking the memo book," a practical joke in which officers draw penises in each other’s daily notebooks.

The NYPD Tapes: Inside Bed-Stuy’s 81st Precinct
This confirms what we have believed for a while now. The police are working on quotas, and are ticketing people to meet them. What gets me is this part

The tapes also refer to command officers calling crime victims directly to intimidate them about their complaints.

WTF? This is serious corruption. The only reason someone would want to intimidate a victim is if the police were crooked and on the side of the criminal.
Here are some examples:
Click on this link to hear the audio

OCTOBER 12, 2009
"How Do We Know This Guy Really Got Robbed?"
Police officers are supposed to take crime complaints, but in this roll call, a sergeant tells cops not to take robbery complaints if the victim won’t immediately return to speak with detectives. She questions the victim’s motives, too.

Click on this link to hear the audio

OCTOBER 4, 2009
"It’s Not About Squashing Numbers"
In this roll call, precinct supervisors order officers to be skeptical about robbery victims, and tell the cops that the precinct commander and two aides call victims to question them about their complaints.

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