Toronto Transformed Into Locked Down Police State

Toronto Transformed Into Locked Down Police State 250610cops

Sweeping police powers with no limits, military style checkpoints, LRAD sound cannons, huge makeshift prisons and a taxpayer bill of $1 billion

Steve Watson
Prisonplanet.com
Friday, Jun 25th, 2010

Downtown Toronto has been transformed into a police state ahead of the G8 and G20 conferences, with police given unprecedented powers to to arrest anyone near the security zone who refuses to identify themselves or agree to a police search.

The Toronto Star reports:

“The regulation was made under Ontario’s Public Works Protection Act and was not debated in the Legislature. According to a provincial spokesperson, the cabinet action came in response to an ‘extraordinary request’ by Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair, who wanted additional policing powers shortly after learning the G20 was coming to Toronto.”

The regulation gives the police authority to question anybody entering the restricted zone from June 14 until June 28, the day after the summits are scheduled to end. As Adam Radwanski of The Globe and Mail reports, there are no limits to police powers during the summit, and no clear legal precedent specifying what they can and can’t do.

CTV.ca reports that there has been an increase in tension in the security zone as police are stopping and searching hundreds of protesters. “If you’re in that zone you’re going to be challenged,” Const. Tim Garland, spokesperson for the Integrated Security Unit told CTV.ca.

Some reports even detail incidents of police randomly stopping people outside the security perimeters who are not even protesters and are merely going about their business.

As our earlier report detailed, Charlie Veitch of the popular London based activist group The Love Police was arrested yesterday in Toronto under the new extraordinary powers for refusing to identify himself.

Police have been preparing for the lockdown for months now. An unprecedented show of force will see up to 20,000 uniformed officers, along with a 1,000 private security guards deployed, as well as Canadian military forces. The security costs are expected to cost the Canadian government (taxpayers) hundreds of millions of dollars, with some estimating the bill will stretch beyond one billion dollars.

Security measures include two large perimeters, walled in with huge 3 meter high fences, with Toronto police in charge of the outer zone and the RCMP in charge of the inner zone. Anyone entering the inner perimeter, where the Metro Convention Centre is located, will be processed through five levels of airport style security screening.

Various checkpoints throughout Toronto have been outfitted with “Magnetometers,” “walk-through metal detectors,” “X-Ray belt driven scanners” and “hand-held metal detectors.”

Residents and workers in the area have been made to register with the authorities to get access to their homes and businesses during the meeting.

The Canadian Forces plans are described as “large-scale operational planning, land and air surveillance, underwater safety and security for the venues and some logistic and ceremonial functions. Support also includes drawing on the CF’s ongoing partnership in the North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD).”

Protesters will also be subject to designated free speech zones. If they breach these zones they will be forced to move or be arrested.

Toronto Transformed Into Locked Down Police State 250610cops3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Police will be using a massive movie studio as a temporary jail. The building is roughly five kilometres from the Convention Centre, outside the two security zones. The plan echoes tactics employed in the U.S. at recent DNC and RNC Conventions, where thousands of protesters were indiscriminately rounded up andkept for up to several hours in temporary prisons.

Police have also been cleared to employ Long Range Acoustic Devices otherwise known as sound cannons.

Civil liberties advocates and activists had requested that a court impose an injunction to prevent police from using the ear-piercing devices, which were used by police and the National Guard to break up protests at last year’s meeting in Pittsburgh.

However, the Ontario Superior Court ruled that the devices could be used after police argued they were essential equipment.

In related news, Infowars reporter Luke Rudkowski and fellow activists have been denied access into Canada altogether.

In a telephone interview with Infowars.com, Luke said he was detained for nearly five hours by Homeland Security and Canadian Customs police on the border in Buffalo, New York. Agents went through his car and laptop looking for anything to arrest and detain the activists. After the Canadians denied Luke, Kelly, and Matt entry into the country, Homeland Security on the American side of the border questioned them once again.

Limited G20 sound cannon use approved

Last Updated: Friday, June 25, 2010 | 12:11 PM ET Comments562Recommend188
CBC News

Sound cannons operated by police may be used only in short bursts during G20 protests in Toronto, a judge has decided.

Sound cannons operated by police may be used only in short bursts during G20 protests in Toronto, a judge has decided.(Frank Gunn/Canadian Press)

A judge has dismissed a motion that sought to ban police use of so-called sound cannons to control crowds during the G20 summit in Toronto.

Ontario Superior Court Justice David Brown’s decision allows police to use the devices, but also places limits on how they can use them. Police must conform to Ontario Provincial Police operating rules for the cannons, the judge said. The voice function of the devices is OK to use, but an alert function, which emits an ear-splitting noise, can only be used in certain circumstances.

In Friday’s decision, Brown also dismissed arguments from civil liberties groups that said allowing the use of sound cannons would infringe on the ability of people to protest.

Toronto police will abide by the court’s ruling, said Chief Bill Blair.

The sound cannons, known formally as long-range acoustical devices, are capable of emitting sounds that can be heard up to 1.5 kilometres away.

In arguing for the injunction, the Canadian Civil Liberties Association and the Canadian Labour Congress said Toronto residents should not be used as "guinea pigs" to see whether so-called sound cannons are safe.

The groups accused police of relying on manufacturer studies about safety, rather than independent research.

Lawyers for Toronto police argued the sound cannons are needed to communicate with a crowd so noisy it may drown out the sound of a traditional megaphone. They compared the maximum decibel level to that of an ambulance siren or leaf blower.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2010/06/25/g20-sound-cannon.html#ixzz0ryv1rKFF

 

Old movie studio to become temporary G20 jail

This building in east-end Toronto will become a temporary jail during the G20 summit in late June.

This building in east-end Toronto will become a temporary jail during the G20 summit in late June.

Updated: Thu Apr. 22 2010 6:06:27 PM
ctvtoronto.ca

Toronto Police will be using an old movie studio as a temporary jail in anticipation of likely arrests during protests at this June’s G20 summit, CTV News has learned.

The Eastern Avenue location is about five kilometres from the Metro Toronto Convention Centre where the leaders and delegations from the world’s 20 leading economies will be meeting on June 26 and 27.

As such, the facility, which will allow the timely processing of those arrested, will be outside the two security zones that will surround the meeting.

"We are doing a lot of work to make sure we mitigate and minimize the disruption," Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair said Thursday.

"I’m increasingly confident we’ll have the resources in place. We’ll be ready."

In terms of a security challenge, officials have said the G20 will be bigger than the recent Vancouver Winter Olympics.

Toronto’s downtown is expected to be flooded with Toronto police, RCMP officers and other security officials. The RCMP will be in charge of the inner zone around the centre, which will be surrounded by a three-metre-high, unscaleable fence.

Residents and those working in the area will have to register to get access to their homes and businesses during the period of the summit.

The heightened security will begin two weeks before the summit.

In another sign of how seriously preparations are being taken, the Toronto police’s Emergency Task Force dealt with a mock hostage-taking in the financial district this past weekend to practice working with private security.

With a report from CTV Toronto’s Michelle Dube

Canada Command – OP Cadence 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits

 

Canada’s Navy supports the 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits

OP Cadence 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits

In this CF file photo taken in August 2009, a member of the Fleet Diving Unit conducts inspections on buoy chains in Nunavut.

Photograph by Corporal Andrew L Davis

The Canadian Forces (CF) are in place and ready to support the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)-led Integrated Security Unit (ISU) for the 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits later this week in Huntsville and Toronto, Ontario. The Canadian Navy, as part of the joint navy, army and air force task force, is providing port security and dive teams to the ISU.

Canada Command is responsible for Canadian Forces (CF) routine and contingency operations in Canada and North America. The Command also coordinates, when requested, CF support to Canadian civil and law enforcement authorities. CF support for the 2010 Summits is under the command of Joint Task Force Central (JTFC), one of six regional task forces reporting to Canada Command.

Publication Date : 24 June 2010

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Canadian Forces (CF) Operation CADENCE 2010 CF Support to the RCMP for the 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits

OP Cadence 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits

The Canadian Forces (CF) provides support to other federal government departments and agencies, when requested. During Operation CADENCE 2010, the CF will support the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)-led Integrated Security Unit (ISU) for the 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits in Huntsville and Toronto, Ontario. In this CF file photo taken in February 2010 during Operation PODIUM, (CF support to the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Games) CF naval officer, Lieutenant-Commander Derek McCliggott (centre) discusses operations with RCMP Sergeant Lyne Baril (back, left) and RCMP Sergeant Mike Lariviere (forefront, rt), at the Op PODIUM Olympic Marine Operations Centre. During Op PODIUM, security and public safety agencies from all levels of government worked together to provide a safe and secure environment.

Photo credit: Sergeant Paz Quillé, Canadian Forces Combat Camera

By: Captain Jennifer Faubert

Security concerns and threats are at the forefront of all summit discussion and activities as the Canadian Forces (CF) prepares to support the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) for the 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits. The CF has a long tradition of supporting national public events and working with other government and non-governmental organizations. Our most recent success, Operation Podium, saw the CF providing security support to the RCMP during the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. For the 2010 Muskoka G-8 Summit in Huntsville and the Toronto G-20 Summit, the CF will support the RCMP-led Integrated Security Unit (ISU).

The RCMP and their law enforcement partners, the Ontario Provincial Police in Huntsville, and the Toronto Police Service and Peel Regional Police Service in Toronto, with support from the CF, will ensure the safety and security of summit participants and all Canadians. “The CF will bring its unique resources and capabilities to help facilitate the ISU’s ability to provide safety and security at the summit venues by monitoring maritime, air, and land approaches,” said Brigadier-General (BGen) Jean Collin, Commander of Joint Task Force Central (JTFC), located in Toronto.

The job of providing security to world leaders, their delegations and the public security falls under the authority of the RCMP. The CF will work with the RCMP and other government agencies in the ISU providing unique military resources and capabilities to help facilitate the ISU’s ability to provide for the safety and security at the summit venues.

The 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits will be one of the largest security events ever held in Canada. For this reason, BGen Collin, responsible for the execution of this operation, has been examining lessons learned from Operation Podium, taking into account that these are two very different events with different security threats and concerns. BGen Collin explained that the Olympics were a sporting event with a security element, where as the summits are the gathering of heads of states in an international forum to advance economic cooperation.

Under the direction of Canada Command (Canada COM) in Ottawa, JTFC will be contributing a number of CF Reserve Force companies that will be engaged in patrolling, observing and executing security functions in and around the Lester B. Pearson International Airport and the Huntsville area. Formed on February 1, 2006, Canada COM is responsible for CF routine and contingency operations in Canada and North America.

“We won’t be doing policing functions such as crowd control but our participation will free up police resources so they can continue on with their normal daily policing business in addition to their duties surrounding the summit,” said BGen Collin.

Military personnel will participate from all three elements. This enables the Commander of JTFC to apply the unique capabilities of each element to the task. Canada’s Air Force will fly surveillance missions, provide early warning detection and air transport in conjunction with their customary North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) duties. The Canadian Navy will provide port security and dive teams while the Canadian Army will maintain surveillance, patrolling and observation posts at the airport and in the Huntsville area. All these capabilities are provided in support of the RCMP-led ISU.

In 2002, Canada hosted a G-8 Summit in Kananaskis, Alberta and the CF provided equipment and personnel in support of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and the RCMP.

While the challenges associated with the 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits are daunting, the Canada First Defence Strategy has positioned the CF with the core capabilities, capacity and flexibility required to quickly and effectively address any potential threats to safety and security.

Captain Jennifer Faubert is a Public Affairs Officer at Joint Task Force Central (JTFC), which is headquartered in Toronto. Ontario.

Publication Date : 14 June 2010

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Canadian Forces Support to the 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits has Direct Link to the Canada First Defence Strategy

OP Cadence 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits

In this 2005 photo, a Canadian Forces (CF) CH-146 Griffon helicopter from 1 Wing Kingston’s 400 Tactical Helicopter Squadron flies over the City of Toronto, past the CN Tower. 400 Tactical Helicopter Squadron is located at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden, Ontario. CF personnel and equipment are frequently tasked for domestic operations to provide support to other federal government partners for security around major public and international events in Canada. In June of 2010, the CF will support the RCMP-led Integrated Security Unit (ISU) for the upcoming G-8 and G-20 Summits that will take place in Huntsville and Toronto, Ontario.

Photo credit: Master-Corporal Larry Wilson, 400 Tactical Helicopter Squadron

The Government of Canada gives clear direction to the Canadian Forces (CF) through theCanada First Defence Strategy regarding CF roles – defending Canada, defending North America and contributing to international peace and security. As the host country for the upcoming G-8 and G-20 Summits in Huntsville and Toronto, Ontario, Canada faces significant challenges in today’s complex and unpredictable security environment. These international events taking place in June of 2010 have the potential to test all three of those roles.

For the G-8 and G-20 Summits, the CF will provide support to the RCMP-led Integrated Security Unit (ISU) with unique military resources and capabilities provided by the army, navy and air force to ensure the safety and security of the Summits’ participants and Canadians.

While the challenges associated with the G-8 and G-20 Summits are daunting, the Canada First Defence Strategy has positioned the CF with the core capabilities, capacity and flexibility required to quickly and effectively address any potential threats to safety and security. Military tasks associated with the Summits include large-scale operational planning, land and air surveillance, underwater safety and security for the venues and some logistic and ceremonial functions. Support also includes drawing on the CF’s ongoing partnership in the North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD).

Canada Command is responsible for Canadian Forces (CF) routine and contingency operations in Canada and North America. The Command also coordinates, when requested, CF support to Canadian civil and law enforcement authorities. CF support to the 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits will be conducted under the command of Joint Task Force Central (JTFC), one of six regional task forces reporting to Canada Command.

Publication Date : 13 April 2010

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Canadian Forces Stand Ready to Support the RCMP for the 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits

2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits

In 2002, Canada hosted a G-8 Summit in Kananaskis, Alberta, and the Canadian Forces provided equipment and personnel in support of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and the RCMP. This photo shows a line of CH-146 Griffon helicopters at Springbank airport just outside of Calgary, in support of the Kananaskis Summit. The helicopters and support personnel were drawn from 408 Squadron in Edmonton, 403 Squadron in Gagetown, N.B., 430 Squadron in Valcartier, Que., 438 Squadron in St.-Hubert, Que., 427 Squadron in Petawawa, Ont. and 400 Squadron in Borden, Ont.

Photo: Sgt. David Snashall, Canadian Forces Combat Camera

Canada’s leadership will be highlighted throughout the first half of 2010, when we will be hosting major international events. In February, the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games will take place, and in June, the G-8 Summit will be held in Huntsville, Ontario, followed by the G-20 Summit in Toronto.

Canada will chair the G-8 Summit as the leaders of eight of the world’s most industrialized countries – Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United States and the United Kingdom – gather at the annual meeting to discuss a broad range of issues, such as fiscal and monetary policy coordination and international development. Industrialized and leading emerging countries meet regularly at G-20 summits which have become an important international forum to advance economic cooperation.

The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade is the lead agency responsible for the coordination and conduct of the G-8 Summit. The job of providing security for the dozens of world leaders, their delegations and the people of the Huntsville area falls under the authority of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). The RCMP has the overall federal lead for the G-8 Summit Integrated Security Unit, which is a joint partnership with the Ontario Provincial Police, Canadian Forces (CF) and other government and law enforcement agencies. It is the job of the ISU to ensure a safe and secure summit for participants, visitors, demonstrators and residents.

The CF has been formally asked by the RCMP to provide unique military resources and capabilities, subject to approval by the Minister of National Defence, which will help facilitate the ISU’s ability to provide safety and security at the summit locations. These unique capabilities include the CF capacity for large-scale planning and logistics.

The CF will participate in the ISU as part of a Canada Command operation. Joint Task Force Central (JTFC), which is the military organization responsible for events and domestic military operations throughout Central Canada, has been tasked with delivering CF support to law enforcement for the 2010 G-8 and G-20 Summits.

Canada Command is responsible for CF routine and contingency operations in Canada and North America. It works in close partnership with federal departments and agencies, as well as continental provincial, territorial and non-government organizations. Its roles include sovereignty patrols, air and maritime search and rescue, civil and humanitarian air (disaster relief), support to law enforcement agencies and support to major public events.

 

 

G20: Activists Arrested, Denied Entry into Canada

Kurt Nimmo
Prison Planet.com

Friday, June 25, 2010

Dan Dicks of Press for Truth reports this morning that Charlie Veitch of The Love Police was arrested yesterday in Toronto for refusing to cooperate with the police.

“While using his megaphone to inform the people of Toronto about G20 related issues we were surrounded by police who demanded our identification. When Charlie stated that he wishes to remain anonymous he was immediately detained and placed under arrest. The officer stated that Charlie was being detained under the ‘public works protection act’ for failing to identify himself,” writes Dicks.

Charlie Veitch produces videos of his confrontations with government officials and police. His Love Police blog is popular. Veitch appeared on the Alex Jones Show on May 20, 2010.

“The province has secretly passed an unprecedented regulation that empowers police to arrest anyone near the G20 security zone who refuses to identify themselves or agree to a police search,” the Toronto Star reports today. “The regulation was made under Ontario’s Public Works Protection Act and was not debated in the Legislature. According to a provincial spokesperson, the cabinet action came in response to an ‘extraordinary request’ by Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair, who wanted additional policing powers shortly after learning the G20 was coming to Toronto.”

Read Dan’s account of the incident here.

Call the Toronto Police to find out Charlie’s status. The number is: 1-416-808-5100. The G8-G20 has it own police force and they can be reached at: 1-888-446-4047.

We Are Change founder Luke Rudkowski and fellow activists were denied access into Canada. In a telephone interview with Infowars.com, Luke said he was detained for nearly five hours by Homeland Security and Canadian Customs police on the border in Buffalo, New York. Agents went through his car and laptop looking for anything to arrest and detain the activists. After the Canadians denied Luke, Kelly, and Matt entry into the country, Homeland Security on the American side of the border questioned them once again.

In 2006, Alex Jones was detained for 15 hours by Canadian immigration on orders of the Bilderberg Group. “Customs openly told Alex as soon as they brought him into custody that the Bilderberg Group was aware of his arrival and that this was the reason for his detainment. All three members of the team were instantly detained despite going through different immigration desks,” Paul Joseph Watson wrote for Prison Planet on June 8, 2006.

 

 

G20: ID checks under fire

Reported by Paola Loriggio on Friday, June 25, 2010

File status: REPORTED FILE

View Original Pitch

Catharine Tunnacliffe was nowhere near the G20 security zone when police stopped her Wednesday morning and asked for identification.

Tunnacliffe, who manages the political science department at the University of Toronto, was cycling to work on Wellesley St. W., more than two kilometres north of the designated “Traffic Zone” where everyone must show ID.

She heard a whistle, then an officer screaming at her to get off the bike and show her driver’s licence. She refused.

“There was definitely a look of confusion and uncertainty when I told him I said I didn’t have a driver’s licence and didn’t have to show ID,” Tunnacliffe said in an email. The Highway Traffic Act states that cyclists only need to give their name and address.

Tunnacliffe said the officer’s belligerent approach — and his refusal to say why she’d been stopped — made her “seriously pissy.”

“It’s the kind of thing where if they’d given me a smile and a friendly wave, called me ‘ma’am,’ and asked me if I minded terribly telling them what my business was at the university, I would have been only too happy to oblige.”

Toronto Police Sgt. Tim Burrows, spokesman for the G8-G20 Integrated Security Unit, said there’s no way to tell whether Tunnacliffe was stopped as part of summit-related security, or just regular policing duties.

Officers should use common sense in dealing with the public, especially when the situation “doesn’t seem nefarious,” he said.

But the checks aren’t arbitrary, Burrows said. Everyone wishing to cross into the security zone will be questioned and searched. “We do respect people’s rights, but we also have to think about public safety.”

Businesses and residents in the core, along with civil liberties groups, continue to oppose “Fortress Toronto” — a mix of fences, checkpoints and security forces officially spanning from King St. W. to Lake Shore Blvd. between Spadina Ave. and Yonge St., but seemingly spreading through much of downtown.

Yesterday OpenFile reported on the existence of new regulations that require people who come within five metres of the security area to give police their name and state the purpose of their visit.

But there has been no explanation for the seemingly arbitrary ID checks that have been occurring elsewhere in the city.

Police “are supposed to act in a way that is proportionate and reasonable,” says Nathalie Des Rosiers, executive director of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association.

“At this stage, there have been no incidents of violence, so they should be far less difficult.”

Photographer Michael Willems says police interrogated him this week after he snapped pictures of officers while on an unrelated assignment downtown.

They told him only “legitimate” photographers could take pictures, and demanded to see his shots, Willems wrote in a blog post.

“The officers were courteous, but they were wrong — very wrong,” he wrote.

Others complain about the amount of identification needed to enter the security zone.

“Not everyone has two pieces of ID,” says Des Rosiers of the CCLA.

But even those who object to the measures are likely to accept them, rather than put up a fight, she said.

“It is difficult for individual citizens to negotiate with the police. We tend to obey and comply.

“That is the reason why NGOs, groups of protection for the rights of citizens, must ask questions of the police to ensure that they are operating within the law. The individual citizen is not in a position to do this.”

 

 

Police questioning in G20 zone leads to complaints

Police question three men passing through the G20 security zone on June 24, 2010. (Ian Munroe/CTV.ca)

Police question three men passing through the G20 security zone on June 24, 2010. (Ian Munroe/CTV.ca)

 

A regulation was passed allowing police to ask for identification of anyone passing through the security zone from June 14 - June 28. (Ian Munroe/CTV.ca)

A regulation was passed allowing police to ask for identification of anyone passing through the security zone from June 14 – June 28. (Ian Munroe/CTV.ca)

Updated: Thu Jun. 24 2010 9:23:02 PM
CTV.ca News Staff

There were signs of mounting tension between police and protesters Thursday afternoon as uniformed officers continued to question people walking through Toronto’s so-called security zone ahead of the G20 summit.

With the city on high alert as world leaders start to arrive, police have had some serious concerns.

On Thursday afternoon, police arrested the driver of a suspicious vehicle and confiscated weapons including a chainsaw, sledge hammer and crossbow. They also laid charges against a second person in an explosives investigation that was announced Wednesday.

Also on Thursday, about 1,000 protesters marched in support of native rights, gathering at Queen’s Park, located just blocks north of the G20 security zone. Police were also hearing reports that another group of demonstrators would attempt breach the security fence surrounding the G20 summit venue. That protest never materialized.

But as the street activity ramps up in advance of the summit, some protesters expressed surprise at the extra scrutiny of their movements.

A group of young men who had been at a community mobilization meeting said police went too far, pulling them aside for questioning while ignoring the two white men and Asian girl they were walking with.

"It was a complete case of racial profiling," said Navyug Gill, one of the men questioned.

The three men, one of whom was sporting a T-shirt that says "G20 child care," were approached by five police officers as they walked west on Front Street towards University Avenue.

They were stopped on their way to a meeting about protest action, Gill said. Police immediately questioned one man about his T-shirt.

"They asked our names, demanded ID and asked if we were afraid to give them our ID," he told CTV.ca. "We were afraid. We didn’t know what they wanted to do with us so we complied."

He said police took notes and called headquarters to verify their identities.

"We told them we’re here to protest against the G20 and we’re walking on our streets in our city."

Const. Tim Garland, spokesperson for the Integrated Security Unit, said a regulation had passed giving police authority to question anybody coming into the restricted zone from June 14 until June 28, the day after the summits are scheduled to end.

G20 security points start at Lake Shore Boulevard to the south, north to King Street, east to Yonge Street and reach west to Spadina Avenue.

"If you’re in that zone you’re going to be challenged," he told CTV.ca.

"To accuse the police of racial profiling is unfair and certainly not the way we’re operating," he continued. "If you’re going to be wearing a T-shirt with an anarchist slogan, it’s going to catch the attention of police. It’s common sense."

But Gill says while he and his friends disapprove of the high-profile government summits, the T-shirt did not have an anarchist message.

He said the man wearing the shirt was a volunteer who was tasked with approaching families at rallies to make sure they had enough sunscreen and juice for their young children.

Gill said these kinds of encounters with authorities "create mistrust between police and the public."

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