Corexit: the Musical!

by M STYBORSKI on MAY 28, 2010 · 8 COMMENTS

A Nalco press release today on Rigzone restates the company’s claim that Corexit is the safest possible dispersant available for use in oil related disasters. Nalco claims that the “safer” Corexit 9500 is the only disperant they are manufacturing for use in the Gulf. Perhaps true but possibly misleading as BP lists 80,345 gallons of the more toxic Corexit 9527 among its weapons for fighting oil slicks and it has already been reported that both versions have been applied in the current disaster. (That’s one-tenth of the 830,000 gallons of Corexit which has been used to date in the Gulf.)

Nalco also claims that the EPA’s Lisa Jackson and RAdm Mary Landry have both touted the positive effects Corexit has had on the oil in the Gulf but this must be taken with a grain of salt. While I’ll refrain from commenting on Landry’s fine ombudsmanship of BP, on May 24th, Jackson is quoted as saying, “Our tracking indicates that the dispersants are breaking up the oil and speeding its biodegradation, with limited environmental impact at this time.” For the records, dispersants do nothing to biodegrade oil. Biodegradation is a natural process which happens with or without application of dispersants. The only thing dispersants do is help the oil lose cohesive bond with itself and the surface, allowing it to sink out of sight.

Unfortunaltely it also increases the area of the oil. From a May 11th Fast Company article:

“They’re also called dispersants for a reason. The chemicals break up the oil and then disperse it, so instead of having the oil collect at the surface, dispersed droplets of oil can spread more quickly and in more directions. This means the droplets linger longer in the water, collecting on the seabed and harming the ecosystem offshore.”

The article also mentions toxicology expert Dr William Sawyer’s claim that Corexit is also known as deodorized kerosene.

The press release then mentions six ingredients of Corexit –not by name, of course– and how they can be found in everyday products such as soap, shampoo, hand creams and household cleaners. Well, they must be safe, right? No one ever got sick from eating soap, right? Just because these chemicals are safe in one setting does not mean they are safe together! Bleach and ammonia by themselves are bad enough but mix them together and you can actually kill yourself from the resultant fumes!

In the “Safety” section of the press release there is this statement:

“Data published by Environment Canada, that country’s main environmental agency, in 1991 showed common household dish soap as having a substantially higher rainbow trout toxicity than COREXIT 9527. Put another way, COREXIT 9527 is more than 7 times safer than dish soap. COREXIT 9500 is the next generation of COREXIT products and features an improved formula.”

What? When you strip the blah-blah from that, it reads: Corexit 9527 is safer than dish soap for rainbow trout. Corexit 9500 is different from 9527 so it’s better. The two statements have NOTHING to do with one another but the spin certainly paints a pretty safe picture! As for the tests on trout, last time I looked there was a slight difference beetween trout and human biology.

The “Biodegredation” section reads thus:

“A March, 1994, report created by France’s Institut National de L’Enviroenment Industriel et des Risques indicated that COREXIT 9500 largely biodegraded in 28 days. COREXIT oil dispersant was first applied to the Gulf oil slick on April 23.”

Well, that’s cool. Gone in 28 days! Except for that “largely” stuck in the middle there. The fact is that the independent lab test –required by France but not the US– stated that 78% of the product degraded over 28 days as reported by theBellingham Herald. I don’t know how long the other 22% lingered but this means that after a month there may be as much as 182,600 gallons (of the 830,000 gallons used so far) of Corexit floating around in the Gulf. What is the half-life of the remaining 22%?

The Nalco data suggests that Corexits degradation happens from the time it hits the surface of the water to a depth of 10 meters (32 feet). Processes differ at different temperatures and pressures. Can Nalco’s data be trusted to remain accurate at a depth of 5000 feet?

The press release closes with a section on “Application” which again states that Corexit should be sprayed from planes and boats. Nowhere does it recommend dumping gallons of Corexit a mile below the surface.

-M Styborski

 

The dispersants Corexit 9500 and 9527 are of similar acute toxicity to animal life.

Abstract Title:

Comparison of acute aquatic effects of the oil dispersant Corexit 9500 with those of other Corexit series dispersants.

Article Link:

Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 1996 Nov ;35(2):183-9.

Article Source:

Pubmed

Abstract Author(s):

I Lee, L L Weetman, M L Sowby, M M Singer, R S Tjeerdema, S George, S Jacobson

Article Affiliation:

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064, USA.

Abstract:

The acute aquatic toxicity of a new Corexit series dispersant, Corexit 9500, was evaluated and compared with that of others in the series using early life stages of two common nearshore marine organisms: the red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) and a kelp forest mysid (Holmesimysis costata). Spiked-concentration testing was performed under closed, flowthrough conditions, with dispersant concentrations measured in real time using UV spectrophotometry. Median-effect concentrations ranged from 12.8 to 19.7 initial ppm for Haliotis and from 158.0 to 245.4 initial ppm for Holmesimysis. The difference in sensitivity of the two types of tests was consistent with patterns seen with other oil dispersants. Also, these data indicate Corexit 9500 to be of similar toxicity to Corexit 9527 and 9554. Corexit 9500 represents a reformulation of a long-time industry "standard," Corexit 9527, to allow use on higher viscosity oils and emulsions. The present data suggest that acute aquatic toxicity concerns surrounding the use of this newer dispersant should not be significantly different from those associated with the use of Corexit 9527.

 

 

Oil dispersants used in Gulf of Mexico spill causing alarm

Published: Monday, May 17, 2010, 3:32 PM     Updated: Monday, May 17, 2010, 3:38 PM

Dennis Pillion, al.com Dennis Pillion, al.com
Follow

Screen shot 2010-05-17 at 2.38.58 PM.pngA U.S. Air Force C-130 crew conducts a spray mission from Stennis International Airport, Kiln, MS in support of Deep Water Horizon. (Still shot from a video by Staff Sgt. Jose Contreras.)

 

BP has used almost 600,000 gallons of the oil dispersant Corexit at the surface of the Gulf of Mexico to break-up the slick from the Deepwater Horizon spill, but concerns are growing about the environmental impact of those chemicals on the Gulf ecosystems and human residents of the area.
Federal officials have expressed the need for more toxicology studies on the dispersants, and whether dispersed oil is any less of a threat than non-dispersed oil. One toxicology expert, Dr. William Sawyer, called the products "deodorized kerosene," and a group of Louisiana fisherman and marine toxicologist Riki Ott are asking President Barack Obama to order BP to stop using the compound.

Most experts won’t go that far, but even EPA administrator Lisa Jackson and NOAA administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco admitted in a recent conference callthat the effects of the dispersants are largely unknown. Most of the studies performed on the agents have been testing effectiveness on dispersing oil, not on toxicity.
"There are a diversity of types of habitats in the Gulf," Lubchenco said. "Many of them are very important in support of a variety of wildlife and fisheries. At this point many of them are at risk of being affected but we don’t have any direct way to know exactly which ones or in what amount."
Over the weekend, the Environmental Protection Agency gave the go-ahead to begin using the dispersants at depth to break up the oil, another largely untested process.
The exact chemical composition of the dispersants being used is not public information, but the products are called Corexit 9527 and Corexit 9500. Corexit 9527 was used in the cleanup of the Exxon Valdez spill, and contains 2-butoxyethanol, a chemical solvent that is used in paint thinners and varnish removers, among other products.
The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, a branch of the CDC, describes 2-butoxyethanol as a toxic compound with a host of negative effects on humans, including kidney and liver damage at high doses. The data material safety sheets for both Corexit 9527 andCorexit 9500 advise "Do not contaminate surface water," under the heading "Environmental Precautions."
Corexit 9500 is a newer formula that does not include 2-butoxyethanol. Jackson said the EPA had approved both Corexit products for use, and did not know how much of the total 582,416 gallons used was 9527 and how much was 9500.
There is also concern that Corexit may not be the best choice to break up Louisiana crude.Greenwire‘s Paul Quinlan reported that 12 EPA-approved dispersants were more effective on southern Louisiana crude, and some of those were less toxic than the Corexit products.
Quinlan also reports that Nalco, the company that makes Corexit, "boasts oil-industry insiders on its board of directors and among its executives, including an 11-year board member at BP and a top Exxon executive."

 

Dispersant Stockpile


Type: Dispersant (Corexit 9500/9527)
Primary Use: Nearshore/Offshore

Use: COREXIT 9527 and COREXIT 9500 are used to disperse oil spilled on the sea, thereby minimizing its environmental impact.

Description: COREXIT 9527 is a blend of oxyalkylate polymers, organic sulfonic acid salt, substituted fatty ester, and glycol ether. This is a concentrated and highly effective oil spill dispersant for use on a wide range of oils. The unique formulation of COREXIT 9527 provides a self-mixing dispersant that is biodegradable and of low toxicity. Based on laboratory tests, COREXIT 9527 is effective on most spreading oils. As with all dispersants, timely application ensures the highest degree of success.

COREXIT 9500 is a high-performance, biodegradable, low toxicity oil spill dispersant that is effective on a wide range of oils, including the heavier, more weathered oils and emulsified oils. COREXIT 9500 contains the same well proven, biodegradable and low toxicity surfactants present in COREXIT 9527, with a new improved oleophilic solvent delivery system.

Aerial spraying: provides the most rapid method of applying dispersants to an oil spill and a variety of aircraft can be used for spraying. For aerial spraying the dispersants are applied undiluted. A typical treatment rate is two to ten US gallons per acre. Typical application altitudes of 30 to 50 feet have been used, although higher altitudes may be effective under certain conditions.

Boat spraying: the dispersants may also be used by boats equipped with spray booms, or fire water cannons.

Handling and storage: this material can be stored in high density polyethylene, stainless steel, or double epoxy phenolic coated carbon steel containers. The containers should always be capped when not in use to prevent contamination and evaporation. Carbon steel and aluminum are not recommended for long-term storage.

 

Dispersants such as COREXIT 9527 
Have Adverse Effects on Biological Processes
Corexit 9527 pdf  
 1-3-03 MSDS of the 6-14-92 Corexit 9527
looks the same as 6-12-92 reiterated?  *
 
 Doesn't look like very much is known about Corexit 9527 
& no other Corexit is found in this data base....
http://hazard.com/msds/tox/tf/q46/q49.html 
                     *** CHEMICAL IDENTIFICATION ***

RTECS NUMBER            : GM2750000
CHEMICAL NAME           : Corexit 9527
CAS REGISTRY NUMBER     : 60617-06-3
LAST UPDATED            : 199710
DATA ITEMS CITED        : 2
COMPOUND DESCRIPTOR     : Mutagen
 
                       *** HEALTH HAZARD DATA ***
 
                            ** MUTATION DATA **
 
TYPE OF TEST            : Mutation in microorganisms
TEST SYSTEM             : Microorganism - not otherwise specified
DOSE/DURATION           : 24300 uL/L
REFERENCE :
   HEREAY Hereditas (Lund, Sweden).  (Gjoerloffsgatan 121, S-261 34 Landskrona,
   Sweden)  V.1-    1947-  Volume(issue)/page/year: 104,317,1986

                          *** STATUS IN U.S. ***
 
   EPA TSCA TEST SUBMISSION (TSCATS) DATA BASE, JULY 2000

 
                            *** END OF RECORD ***

http://www.valdezlink.com/inipol/pages/again.htm

Exxon’s Planning on Dumping Corexit in Alaska waters again?

Note: 8-1-89 version of Corexit only gives ethylene oxide as the dangerous ingredient & no others

Note:  6-14-92 only lists 2-butoxyethanol as an ingredient, no others  *

"The Corexit 9500 * is the primary chemical stockpiled in Alaska.

So far, in RCAC sponsored research, unfortunately,

9500 is more toxic and less effective than 9527,

but that is for Alaskan waters – considering temperature and salinity.

The 9527 is more effective in warmer waters.

The ingredients for Corexit 9527 include: 2-Butoxyethanol

(Ethylenenglycol Monobutyl Ether), Butyl Cellosolve, Butyl Glycol, Glycol Ether EB

(See above pdf document for more details).

For more info. you might want to try this website link:

http://msds.pdc.cornell.edu/msds/siri/files/bry/brybg.html

And, unfortunately, they still have plans to use these chemicals as a

tool for addressing spilled oil on water." says RCAC member.

So why use any dispersants?

It only ads chemicals that may never leave the water… & for what purpose?

Even the ‘purported’ bioremediation chemicals

only claimed to ‘speed things

up by a few days’

The damage to the herring … they’ll probably never recover…

www.valdezlink.com/inipol/no.htm

Biologists saying that a virus was the cause … is only a theory, too,

they didn’t input what chemicals could still be in the water.

"dispersants like Corexit 9527  (another Exxon formulation) are much less toxic than the dispersants used in the 1960s," Wells said, "but even these new dispersants have adverse effects on biological processes." quoted by ADN 8-15-89

http://www.adn.com/evos/stories/EV147.html

 

MSDS information for Oil Spill Dispersants Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 and Safety Info from EPA, CDC, & OSHA

At MSDSonline, we have noticed a significant number of searches on our database for MSDS information related to Nalco products Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527, the two dispersants being used in the oil spill cleanup effort.

As a public service, and in an effort to assist the EPA in making MSDS information about these two dispersants more accessible to oil spill workers and the general public, here are links to the MSDSs.

According to the Deepwater Horizon Response Unified Command’s website, as of June 14, 2010, over 1,262,000 gallons of dispersants have been used as part of BP’s oil spill cleanup efforts.  You can learn more about the dispersants, and their effects, on the EPA’s website.

If you are working with dispersants as part of the cleanup effort, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have the following recommendations:

  • Mix and load dispersants in well ventilated areas.
  • Use automated spraying systems to apply dispersants when available.
  • Remain upwind of the mists that are generated if spray systems are manned.
  • Wear nitrile gloves during mixing, loading, or spraying of dispersants to prevent skin irritation.
  • Wear protective eyewear when mixing, loading, or spraying dispersants.
  • Wash hands and any other body parts exposed to dispersants thoroughly with soap and water.
  • If personal air monitoring indicates the above steps are not effective at reducing exposures below applicable OELs, then respiratory protection would be needed.

Read the CDC’s Reducing Occupational Exposures while Working with Dispersants During the Gulf Oil Spill Response for more details.

OSHA also has a page dedicated to oil spill workers and their safety. On it you’ll find information on specific hazards faced by workers, contact information for local officials and the latest news on the cleanup effort.

Anyone with questions about any of the chemicals used in the cleanup effort is encouraged to search our MSDS database.

Read more: http://blog.msdsonline.com/2010/06/msds-information-for-dispersants-corexit-9500-and-corexit-9527-and-safety-info-from-epa-cdc-osha/#ixzz0rDPexQ4E

 

 

What the Hell Is Corexit?

By bmartin on June 3, 2010 7:23 AM

 DH_Coast-Guard_rescue.jpg

Corexit, the chemical dispersant being used by BP to break up its massive and growing oil spill, is not the cause of physical symptoms among cleanup workers, says the product’s manufacturer, Nalco.

Several news sources, including the NYT, are reporting today that the Naperville, Illinois-based company is defending the safety of Corexit, "when used as directed," although Nalco advises that BP’s direct application of Corexit to the spewing oil well is "unprecedented." The Naperville Sun Times says that 993,000 gallons of Corexit have been sprayed or dumped in the Gulf of Mexico as of yesterday. In May, the EPA asked BP to back off on its use of Corexit in the Gulf spill.

So what’s in Corexit? It’s hard to know exactly, because part of the formula is proprietary. According to the material safety datasheet for Corexit 9500, the "clear, hazy, amber" liquid contains

  • 10%-30% hydrotreated light petroleum distillates (a mineral spirit-type solvent, as far as I can tell);
  • 1%-5% propylene glycol (a widely used solvent and chemical cousin of ethylene glycol); and
  • 10%-30% "organic sulfonic acid salt," which is proprietary (the EPA evidently has the full formula, according to the NYT).

For humans, Corexit appears to be merely a short-term irritant; it is not defined as hazardous or toxic by EPA standards. Safety precautions (eg, gloves, splash goggles) are intended to keep the product away from the skin and eyes. Filter masks are recommended when air concentrations are expected to reach a certain threshold.

Today’s PubMed search for "Corexit" returns 59 articles, dating back to 1974. No article pertains to human safety, and 37 articles concern the product’s effect on sea life. A search for "Corexit 9500" returns 22 articles, dating back to 1996; 12 pertain to animal or plant effects.

The upshot: Products like Corexit 9500 are very effective oil dispersants, but they may increase (at least temporarily) the concentrations of toxic polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in oil-contaminated water, presumably through their dispersant effects. And there are evidently A TON of variables to consider when deciding to use dispersants—like, the concentration of the crude oil, the "weathered" condition of the oil, water salinity, oil-exposure conditions (eg, whether declining or continuous), and the myriad, myriad, myriad species at risk and their life cycles.

Singer et al (1996). Comparison of acute aquatic effects of the oil dispersant Corexit 9500 with those of other Corexit series dispersants. Corexit 9500 was found to be similarly "toxic" to other Corexit products on early-life stages of the red abalone and kelp forest mysid. The authors, from the University of California, Santa Cruz, wrote that Corexit 9500 is a "reformulation of a long-time industry ‘standard,’ Corexit 9527, to allow use on higher viscosity oils and emulsions."

George-Ares and Clark (2000). Aquatic toxicity of two Corexit dispersants. Two Exxon employees described the in-vitro "low to moderate toxicity" of Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 on "most aquatic species." They also described the variables affecting toxicity (such as species, life stage, duration of exposure, and temperature) and addressed environmental factors that inform the use of dispersants.

Pollino and Holloway (2002). The toxicity of testing of crude oil and related compounds using early life stages of the crimson-spotted rainbowfish (Melantotaenia fluviatilis). Australian academicians determined that Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 were less acutely toxic than naphthalene and crude oil-water-dispersant mixtures on the larvae of freshwater rainbowish.

Ramachandran et al (2004). Oil dispersant increases PAH uptake by fish exposed to crude oil. Canadian researchers concluded that the use of dispersants, like Corexit 9500, actually increases the exposure of fish to toxic crude-oil hydrocarbons.

Fuller et al (2004). Comparative toxicity of oil, dispersant, and oil plus dispersant to several marine species. Scientists at Texas A&M observed that crude oil with dispersant was equally or less toxic that crude oil alone on 2 fish and 1 shrimp species. "Unweathered" crude oil (dominated by "soluble hydrocarbon fractions") was more toxic than weathered oil (which was dominated by "colloidal oil fractions"). In declining exposure conditions, weathered and unweathered oil with dispersant were equally toxic to a standardly tested fish species, Menidia beryllina. Both media were dominated by the less toxic "colloidal oil fractions." The consistent finding in this variable-results study: declining-exposure conditions were less toxic than continuous-exposure conditions.

Couillard et al (2005). Effect of dispersant on the composition of the water-accommodated fraction of crude oil and its toxicity to larval marine fish. Researchers from the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans concluded that Corexit 9500, when added to seawater-accommodated fractions of light crude oil, multiplied the concentrations of PAH and was associated with higher mortality rates in larvalmummichog.

Liu et al (2006). Field investigation on the toxicity of Alaska North Slope crude oil (ANSC) and dispersed ANSC crude to Gulf killifish, Eastern oyster and white shrimp. Investigators at Louisiana State University found that Corexit 9500 was an effective oil dispersant and facilitated the rapid reduction of hydrocarbon concentrations. At testing conditions, most of the tested juvenile organisms (>83%) survived "well" after 24 hours of exposure. A crude oil concentration higher than 30 ppm was required for "any significant toxic effect."

Ramachandran et al (2006). Influence of salinity and fish species on PAH uptake from dispersed crude oil. Water salinity reduced PAH exposure (by reducing PAH solubility) and the efficiency of dispersants (but only at the highest tested salinity). The Canadian authors concluded that the risk of PAH exposure from dispersed oil will be greatest where salinity is lowest—that is, in coastal waters.

Anderson et al (2009). Preliminary investigation of the effects of dispersed Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil on developing topsmelt embryos, Atherinops affinis. Again, Corexit 9500 increased the hydrocarbon concentrations in water-accommodated oil fractions and this effect appeared to adversely affect the survival of topsmelt embryos, according to researchers of the University of California, Davis.

Jung et al (2009). Biochemical changes in rockfish, Sebastes schlegeli, exposed to dispersed crude oil. Korean investigators confirmed that oil dispersants, like Corexit 9500, increase the exposure of fish to oil hydrocarbons.

Lin et al (2009). Characterization of the metabolic actions of crude versus dispersed oil in salmon smolts via NMR-based metabolomics. Taiwanese scientists concluded that "dispersant treatment significantly decreased the lethal potency of crude oil to salmon smolts," and described several variable metabolic effects that may be useful for monitoring sublethal actions of dispersed oil on fish.

Duarte et al (2010). Acute effects of chemically dispersed crude oil on gill ion regulation, plasma ion levels and haematological parameters in tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum). Investigators in the Amazon reported that chemically dispersed crude oil impairs gill function (ie, ion regulation) in tambaqui to a greater extent than untreated crude oil or Corexit 9500 alone.

Video still of burning Deepwater Horizon rig from YouTube.

06/07/10 addendum: BP’s use of 1 million or so gallons of dispersant may also confound the cleanup effort in the Gulf. It’s certainly to BP’s advantage to obscure the scope of the spill, and Admiral Thad Allen of the Coast Guard says that dispersants "have succeeded at fragmenting one giant spill into ‘hundreds of thousands’ of mini spills," reports today’s Politics Daily. BP’s use of dispersant directly on the wellhead is also likely to prevent crude oil from rising to the surface, where it is easier to spot and clean up. 

National Contingency Plan Product Schedule

As required by Subpart J of the National Contingency Plan, EPA maintains the National Contingency Plan (NCP) Product Schedule.

The table below shows all products currently listed in the NCP Product Schedule. To limit the view to a specific category, use the drop down box in the "Category" column.

For more information on the Product Schedule, contact the NCP Product Schedule Information Line.

Product

Category

View by: All CategoriesBioremediation AgentDispersantMiscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent (MOSCA)Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCASurface Washing Agent

ALSOCUP

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

AQUACLEAN

Surface Washing Agent

AQUA N-CAP™ POLYMER

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

B&S INDUSTRIAL (see STEP ONE)

Bioremediation Agent

BET BIOPETRO (formerly BET BIOPETRO HEAVY)

Bioremediation Agent

BG-CLEAN™ 401

Surface Washing Agent

BILGE CLEAR (see S-200)

Bioremediation Agent

BIODISPERS (formerly PETROBIODISPERS)

Dispersant

BIOSOLVE®HYDROCARBON MITIGATION™ AGENT

Surface Washing Agent

BIOWORLD BIOREMEDIATION HYDROCARBON TREATMENT PRODUCTS

Bioremediation Agent

CIAGENT (formerly CI AGENT, CHEAP INSURANCE, and PETRO-CAPTURE)

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

CLEAN SPLIT (see SPLIT DECISION SC)

Surface Washing Agent

CN-110

Surface Washing Agent

COREXIT®EC7664A (formerly COREXIT 7664)

Surface Washing Agent

COREXIT®EC9500A (formerly COREXIT 9500)

Dispersant

COREXIT®EC9580A (formerly COREXIT 9580 SHORELINE CLEANER)

Surface Washing Agent

COREXIT®EC9527A (formerly COREXIT 9527)

Dispersant

CYTOSOL

Surface Washing Agent

DISPERSIT SPC 1000™

Dispersant

DO-ALL #18

Surface Washing Agent

DUO-SPLIT (see SPLIT DECISION SC)

Surface Washing Agent

ELASTOL

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

ENVIROCLEAN (formerly ENVIRO CLEAN 165)

Surface Washing Agent

E-SAFE©

Surface Washing Agent

F-500

Surface Washing Agent

FINASOL OSR 52

Dispersant

FIREMAN’S BRAND SPILLCLEAN (see SPILLCLEAN)

Dispersant

GENISIS WE-F (see OPPENHEIMER FORMULA)

Bioremediation Agent

GOLD CREW SW

Surface Washing Agent

INIPOL EAP 22

Bioremediation Agent

JD-109

Dispersant

JD-2000™

Dispersant

JE1058BS

Bioremediation Agent

LAND AND SEA RESTORATION

Bioremediation Agent

MARE CLEAN 200 (formerly MARE CLEAN 505)

Dispersant

MARI-ZYME (see ZYME-FLOW)

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

MICRO-BLAZE®

Bioremediation Agent

MICRO CLEAN (see NATURE’S WAY HS)

Surface Washing Agent

MIGHT MIKE BPT (see OPPENHEIMER FORMULA)

Bioremediation Agent

NALE-IT

Surface Washing Agent

NATURAL ENVIRO 8000 BIOREMEDIATION (see OPPENHEIMER FORMULA)

Bioremediation Agent

NATURE’S WAY HS

Surface Washing Agent

NATURE’S WAY PC (see NATURE’S WAY HS)

Surface Washing Agent

NEOS AB3000

Dispersant

NOKOMIS 3-AA

Dispersant

NOKOMIS 3-F4

Dispersant

NOKOMIS 5-W New!

Surface Washing Agent

OIL BOND® New!

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent (MOSCA)

OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent (MOSCA)

OIL SPILL EATER II

Bioremediation Agent

OPPENHEIMER FORMULA

Bioremediation Agent

PES-51

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

PETRO-CLEAN

Surface Washing Agent

PETRO-GREEN ADP-7 (formerly D-14)

Surface Washing Agent

PETROTECH 25

Surface Washing Agent

PETRO-TREAT (see OPPENHEIMER FORMULA)

Bioremediation Agent

POWERCLEAN (see NATURE’S WAY HS)

Surface Washing Agent

PREMIER 99

Surface Washing Agent

PRISTINE SEA II

Bioremediation Agent

PROCLEANS

Surface Washing Agent

PX 700™

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

RAPIDGRAB 2000™

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

S-200

Bioremediation Agent

S-200C (see S-200)

Bioremediation Agent

SAF-RON GOLD

Dispersant

SC-1000™

Surface Washing Agent

SEA BRAT #4

Dispersant

SEACARE E.P.A. (see DISPERSIT SPC 1000™)

Dispersant

SF-GOLD DISPERSANT (see SAF-RON GOLD)

Dispersant

SHEENCLEAN (see S-200)

Bioremediation Agent

SHEEN-MAGIC©

Surface Washing Agent

SIMPLE GREEN®

Surface Washing Agent

SPILL GREEN LS

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent (MOSCA)

SPILLCLEAN (SW-36) or SPILLCLEAN ["Concentrate"] (a/k/a FIREMAN’S BRAND SPILLCLEAN)

Surface Washing Agent

SPILLREMED (MARINE)®

Bioremediation Agent

SPLIT DECISION SC (formerly SPLIT DECISION)

Surface Washing Agent

STEP ONE

Bioremediation Agent

SUPERALL #38 (see TOPSALL #30)

Surface Washing Agent

SX-100®

Surface Washing Agent

SYSTEM E.T. 20 (formerly MCW.B 20)

Bioremediation Agent

The OPPENHEIMER FORMULA I (see OPPENHEIMER FORMULA)

Bioremediation Agent

TOPSALL #30

Surface Washing Agent

TXCHEM HE-1000™

Surface Washing Agent

UNITED 658 PETRO-ZYME (see ZYME-FLOW)

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

VB591™, VB997™, BINUTRIX® (formerly MYCOBAC TX-20)

Bioremediation Agent

WASTE-SET #3200®

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

WASTE-SET #3400®

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

WMI-2000

Bioremediation Agent

ZI-400

Dispersant

ZI-400 OIL SPILL DISPERSANT (see ZI-400)

Dispersant

ZYME-FLOW

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

ZYME-TREAT (see ZYME-FLOW)

Miscellaneous Oil Spill Control Agent – MOSCA

Advertisements