Anti-Defamation League

David Dees: Conspiratorial Artist

Posted: June 20, 2008

David Dees, a Louisville, Kentucky-based graphic artist, has found a large audience for his anti-Semitic and conspiratorial art. This artwork has been circulated on extremist email groups, published on the Websites of 9/11 conspiracy theorists and turned into videos posted on YouTube and other Websites. A biography of Dees posted to his Website claims that his images are "an attempt to wake others up about the onslaught of the elite’s power hungry world government plan of domination."

A great deal of Dees’ art is overtly anti-Semitic and many of his images promote Holocaust denial. In one image, prisoners are disembarking from a train at Auschwitz. In the foreground a man holds a placard reading "What really happened?" while "Truth does not fear investigation" – a line used by Holocaust deniers – is written on the side of a cattle car. In another image a prisoner jailed for having "asked for proof of 6 million gassed during Holocaust" is imprisoned between a "serial rapist" and a "murderer." Faceless guards are dressed in riot control outfits with a Star of David with the letter Z at its center on their chests and Israeli police badges on their sleeves. Another image depicts a woman being zapped by a laser gun by the same faceless guards as she reads a book entitled Did Six Million Really Die?

In yet another, Dees uses pictures of the gas chambers at Auschwitz and promotes the lie that Zyklon-B gas was used to kill lice, not people, in Auschwitz, which he asserts has been proven by "scientific testing." This falsehood is at the heart of many Holocaust deniers’ propaganda. In the same image, Dees alleges that it is the "Zionists" who claim the gas was used "to exterminate millions of Jews," again suggesting that the Holocaust is a myth created by those who wanted to establish a Jewish state.

The Star of David with the letter Z (most likely referring to Zionists) at its center is a mainstay in Dees’ anti-Semitic images, whether on the uniforms of the faceless guards, within a red mushroom cloud hovering over an American city, on a pendant on the wrist of California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (who wears a Nazi badge on his lapel), or in a dark sky over the chained wrists of an Arab child. In the context of Dee’s images, the Star of David with the letter Z suggests Jewish control over individuals and world events.

In another anti-Semitic image, Ariel Sharon, the former Israeli Prime Minister, is shown standing in a pool of American soldiers’ blood next to Dick Cheney, a tiny George Bush in Sharon’s jacket pocket.

Dees’ bio claims that his blatantly anti-Semitic images, which question the Holocaust or suggest that Jews control the government or world events, are "Pro-Jewish, but extremely Anti-Zionist."

He does not limit himself to the creation of anti-Semitic images. Promoting his art as "satire," he has posted images to his Websites depicting President Bush as a bumbling leader and Americans as overweight, addicted to fast food, and misinformed by mainstream media. In dozens of other conspiratorial images hosted on additional pages of his Websites or elsewhere, Dees criticizes Bush, Dick Cheney, and other American leaders with gruesome imagery, accusing them of murdering Iraqis and Americans and butchering the United States Constitution. Many of the images also promote some of the more popular current Internet conspiracy theories, including the idea that the American government staged the 9/11 terrorist attacks, that a secret group known as the Bilderbergs controls world events, and that "chemtrails" (the lines of exhaust left in the sky by passenger airplanes) spread deadly illnesses.

Rense, a Website that posts anti-Semitic material, maintains an extensive and regularly updated archive of Dees’ images and often posts a Dees image on its front page. Rense also provides links to virulent anti-Semitic writings hosted on other Websites, including a post by the "dancing street preacher" Brother Nathanael Kapner accusing Jews of creating a "Jewish police state" in America, and Judicial-Inc, which on a daily basis updates its collection of posts accusing Jews of plotting every perceived ill in the world, from the mistreatment of Native Americans to the promulgation of pornography to even being Jack the Ripper, a late 19th century English serial killer. Both of Dees’ own Websites link directly to Rense and have advised visitors, "This art is free to use for non-profit purposes, and I encourage you to openly distribute to others with the hope it will educate, enlighten, deprogram, and at least, entertain." Dees has also contributed the artwork and cover illustrations for Republic, an anti-government, conspiratorial magazine.

Dees, who calls himself a "freelance artist and illustrator," claims to have over 20 years of experience as a graphic artist.

David Dees’ political satire illustrations set to the tune of Don Henley’s "Inside Job".
LYRICS:
While you were sleeping
They came and took it all away
The lanes and the meadows
The places where you used to play
It was an inside job
By the well-connected
Your little protest
Summarily rejected
It was an inside job
Like it always is
Chalk it up to business as usual
While we are dreaming
This little island disappears
While you are looking the other way
Theyll take your right to own your own ideas
And its an inside job
Favors collected
Your trusted servants
Have left you unprotected
It was an inside job
Like it always is
Just chalk it up
To business as usual
You think that youre so smart
But you dont have a fucking clue
What those men up in the towers
Are doing to me and you
And theyll keep doin it and doin it
And doin it and doin it
And doin it and doin it
And doin it and doin it
Until we all wake up
Wake up, wake up, wake up, wake up
I know what Ive done wrong
I am acquainted with the night
I know how hard it is
To always walk out in the light
And its an inside job
To learn about forgiving
Its an inside job
To hang on to the joy of living
They know the road by which you came
They know your mothers maiden name
And what you had for breakfast
And what youve hidden in the mattress
Insect politics
Indifferent universe
Bang your head against the wall
But apathy is worse
Its an inside job
Its an inside job
Its an inside job
Yeh, yeah
Its an inside job
Its an inside job
Its an inside job
Its an inside job
Its an inside job
Its an inside job

OF COURSE IT WAS!!!…???

 

ADL PROPAGANDA

NoCritZion (1)

Introduction

Symbols are the most powerful communication tools that have ever existed. Because they have the ability to convey so much meaning, intent and significance in such a compact, immediately recognizable form, the effect that they have is tremendous. One need only reflect on the reverence or passion that symbols ranging from the American flag to the Star of David to the Christian cross to the Red Cross can evoke to be able to understand exactly how powerful a symbol can be.
Unfortunately, symbols can convey negative connotations as well as positive. Some symbols are meant to convey feelings of hate or anger, or meant to instill in those who see the symbols feelings of fear and insecurity. Hate symbols, for instance, can be found scrawled on the outside walls of synagogues, churches and schools; tattooed on the bodies of white supremacists; or displayed on jewelry or clothing. These symbols give extremists a sense of power and belonging, as well as a quick way of identifying others who share their beliefs. This database provides an overview of many such symbols frequently used by neo-Nazis, the Ku Klux Klan, racist skinheads, racist prison gangs and other hate or extremist groups or movements.
Users of this database should keep in mind, however, that few symbols ever represent just one idea or are used exclusively by one group. For example, the Confederate Flag is a symbol that is frequently used by white supremacists but which also has been used by people and groups that are not racist. To some it may signify pride in one’s heritage but to others it suggests slavery or white supremacy. Similarly, other symbols in this database may be significant to groups or individuals who are not extreme or racist. The descriptions here point out significant multiple meanings but may not be able to relay every single possible meaning of a particular symbol. For this reason, all of the symbols depicted here must be evaluated in the context in which they are used.

 

Hate Symbols according to the ADL

racist symbol - Celtic Cross
racist symbol - Outlined Othala Rune
racist symbol - Outlined Othala Rune
racist symbol - Heavy Othala Rune
racist symbol - Confederate Flag
racist-symbol - Aryan or White Power Fist

prison tattoo -- Nazi Low Riders
neo-nazi symbol - Nazi Flag
neo-nazi symbol - Eagle on Swastika
neo-nazi symbol - SS Lightning Bolts
neo-nazi symbol - Death's Head
neo-nazi symbol - Iron Cross with Swastika

neo-nazi symbol - Triskele
skinhead symbol - Boots
skinhead symbol - Hammerskins
skinhead symbol - Hammerskin Logo
skinhead symbol - Crucified Skinhead
skinhead symbol - Skinhead Girl

skinhead symbol -- Skin Fist
skinhead symbol -- War Skins
group symbol -- American Front
group symbol -- American Nazi Party
group symbol -- Aryan Nations
group symbol -- Hammerskins

group symbol -- Ku Klux Klan
group symbol -- National Alliance
group symbol -- NAAWP
group symbol -- Crosstar
group symbol -- National Socialist Movement
group symbol - The Order

group symbol - Posse Comitatus
group symbol -- Stormfront
group symbol -- Posse Comitatus
group symbol -- World Church of the Creator
prison tattoo -- Elbow Web
prison tattoo -- AB Clover

prison tattoo -- Aryan Brotherhood
prison tattoo -- Black Guerilla Family
Rock Against Communism
Hangman's Noose
Orion - KKK

White Revolution
Blood & Honour
Pitbull
Fiery Cross
Imperial German Flag
Tyr Rune

valknot
life rune

crossed grenades

Volksfront
Black Panthers
Peckerwood

Swastika Variants
Swastika Variants
Swastika Variants
Swastika Variants
Swastika Variants
Swastika Variants

Swastika Variants
Swastika Variants
Swastika Variants
Swastika Variants
Swastika Variants

Group Symbol__Skrewdriver
Sturmabteilung
Fourth Reich
Phineas Priest
Wolfsangel
Vinlanders

Vinlanders

racist symbol - Heavy Othala Rune

Sunwheel

Number Symbols and Acronyms

These popular symbols and acronyms are shorthand for racist and anti-Semitic ideas. The symbols offer quick and easy reference points for extremists who want their worship of Hitler and the white race, their association with the Klan, or their hatred of the "Zionist-occupied government" known by using a few numbers or letters.

Racist Acronyms

RAHOWA  The expression "Racial Holy War," signifies the battle that white supremacists believe will pit the white race against minorities and Jews and lead to Aryan rule over the world.

ZOG/JOG  These terms refer to the belief that the Jews occupy and control the government, as well as the media. The letters often appear in a circle with a slash over it.

SWP  This is a common acronym used by racists to signify Supreme White Power, the ideological basis of white supremacists’ belief system.

WPWW  This common acronym signifies White Pride World Wide. It is used as a greeting by white supremacists to show pride in the white race around the world.

CI  These letters stand for Christian Identity, which holds that white Europeans—not Jews—are the real Biblical "Chosen People," that the white race is inherently superior, that Blacks and other nonwhite races are soulless "mud peoples" on the same level as animals, and that Jews are descendants of Satan.

UAO  United As One is a short greeting used by racists to signify the need to unite for a common cause—the preservation of the white race.

DOC  DOC (Disciples of Christ) refers to a fictional racist skinhead gang in the movie, "American History X." Now, some racist skinheads actually tattoo themselves with the acronym DOC, paying homage to the gang in the movie.

The term "Disciples of Christ" also has many non-extremist uses. For example, the Disciples of Christ (D.O.C.), also known as the Christian Church, is the name of a non-racist mainstream Protestant religious sect founded in the early 19th century in the United States. In addition, Disciples of Christ (D.O.C.) is the name of a non-racist Christian-oriented hip-hop R&B band.

Unsere Ehre Heisst Treue  "Unsere Ehre Heisst Treue" was the slogan of Hitler’s Waffen-SS troops during World War II, and can still be found on banners at meetings of former Waffen-SS units. Today, it is used by neo-Nazis in the original German or its English translation, "Our Honor is Loyalty," to demonstrate allegiance to the white supremacist movement. Neo-Nazi skinheads also have tattooed the slogan on their bodies. Some white supremacist groups use the slogan as a tag line in their publications to express solidarity with others in the white power movement. The expression was also used by Ernest Windholz, a member of the far-right Austrian Freedom Party, during a 2000 ceremony honoring activists from that party.

ORION  "Our Race Is Our Nation" is a racist slogan that emphasizes that racial ties are paramount to all else. Within the United States, for example, a white supremacist might use it to suggest that he or she owes allegiance to his or her race, rather than to the United States itself. White supremacists in other countries may use it similarly. In an international context, it can be used to suggest that all white people, whether from Europe or the United States or elsewhere, are one "nation," opposed and superior to all other races.

Background/History

The slogan "Our Race Is Our Nation" is used by a variety of groups. Christian Identity adherents like it because it is compatible with their belief that white people are descended from the ancient tribes of the Kingdom of Israel. There is even an Identity Ku Klan Klan group, based in Alabama, known as the "Orion Knights of the Ku Klux Klan." It is also used among neo-Nazis and racist skinheads. The Canadian white supremacist group Heritage Front adopted the slogan as its official motto.

KIGY 

KIGY is commonly used as shorthand to indicate membership/affiliation with the Ku Klux Klan. It is used primarily as a salutation, but often forms the basis for e-mail addresses, Web page addresses, and more.

Background/History

KIGY appears to have originated with the revival of the Ku Klux Klan after 1915 and became a widely used Klan acronym (along with two others that have survived: AKIA for "A Klansman I Am" and AYAK for "Are You a Klansman"). Although the Second Ku Klux Klan did not survive, much of its terminology and many of its rituals did, and later Klan groups freely used them.

ROA  Race Over All is a white supremacist slogan popularized by the neo-Nazi group Volksfront, which uses it as their slogan. It is often used, in its acronym form (ROA), as a salutation or greeting on on-line message forums or social networking communities.

Number Symbols

14 (words)  "We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children."

88  "Heil Hitler."

14/88   Often, the two numbers are used in conjunction to indicate a belief both in the ideology of National Socialism and the validity of the "14 words." This symbol can often be found at the close of a letter

5(words)  "I have nothing to say."

311  The eleventh letter of the alphabet is the letter "K"; thus 3 times 11 equals "KKK," or Ku Klux Klan. 311 is sometimes used as a greeting to demonstrate membership in the KKK or simply sympathy with the Klan and its ideology. There is also a popular rock band with the name "311" which is not at all hate-oriented.

33/6  Thirty-three is 3 times 11. Since the eleventh letter of the alphabet is K, three Ks signify KKK or Ku Klux Klan. The "6" signifies the sixth or current era of the Klan. 33/6 is also used as a greeting by Klan members.

666  Satan or evil

83  The eighth letter of the alphabet is H and the third letter is C, thus 83 stands for "Heil Christ," a greeting used by racist organizations that consider themselves also to be Christian.

100%  This is an expression of an individual’s pure Aryan or white roots. It is common among white supremacists. It is also a statement by white supremacists on the need for a pure, white race that is uncorrupted by interracial relationships

4/19  The anniversary date of two events: the confrontation between Federal agents and the Branch Davidians in Waco, Texas in 1993, and the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing carried out by Timothy McVeigh. This date is sometimes used as a tattoo by anti-government racists.

4/20  The anniversary of Adolf Hitler’s birthday is also used as a tattoo by racists and neo-Nazis, to affirm their belief in the ideals of National Socialism. A common but very different meaning for "4/20" (or "4:20" or "420") is as a slang term associated with smoking marijuana.

28 Blood & Honour is an international neo-Nazi/racist skinhead group started by British white supremacist and singer Ian Stuart. It has chapters around the world, primarily in Europe, but does have members in the United States.

18  The first letter of the alphabet is A; the eighth letter of the alphabet is H. Thus, 1 plus 8, or 18, equals AH, an abbreviation for Adolf Hitler. Neo-Nazis use 18 in tattoos. The number is also used by Combat 18, a violent British neo-Nazi group that chose its name in honor of Adolf Hitler.

23  The 23rd letter of the alphabet is W. Therefore, white supremacists and racist skinheads use 23 in tattoos to represent "W," as an abbreviation for the word "white."

White Power Music

White Power Music -- RAHOWAWhite Power Music -- Keep It WhiteWhite Power Music -- White Pride World WideWhite Power Music -- SkrewdriverWhite Power Music -- Nordic ThunderWhite Power Music -- Brutal AttackWhite Power Music -- White Pride World Wide

"White power" music is the focal point for many racist skinheads seeking a common culture. These skinheads, from the U.S. and abroad, attend concerts where white power bands belt out songs that attack and dehumanize Blacks, Jews and other minorities. The names of these bands — Extreme Hatred, Angry Aryans, and Aggravated Assault — reveal the hostile ideology that drives them. These bands create their own logos and proudly display them on CDs that glorify violence against minorities, in particular Jews.

White power "Oi!" music really has had a notable presence in the United States only since the mid-1980s. It was born out of a skinhead and punk music subculture that made its way into this country from Great Britain in the mid-1970s. At first quite raw in its quality and promotion, the white power music scene has evolved into a well-marketed tool to tap into alienated and often violent youth in the United States, Europe and other countries. Hate groups have been successful in using white power music to recruit these young people into the white supremacist movement by giving them a sense of power and belonging. The lyrics are angry and vicious, the authors directing their wrath against Jews and non-whites — the people they blame for society’s ills and the failings in their own lives. White power band members are typically covered with tattoos ranging from various neo-Nazi symbols to other more general racist symbols and slogans.

Resistance Records, Panzerfaust Records, Tri-State Terror and Imperium Records are some of the better-known labels that currently sell this particularly odious music through their publications and on their Web sites. Skrewdriver, Blue Eyed Devils, Bound for Glory, Rahowa, Extreme Hatred, Angry Aryans, Aggravated Assault, Nordic Thunder, Blood and Honour, Brutal Attack, Berserkr and Max Resist are some of the better-known white power bands. It is obvious from several of these groups’ record covers on this page, they go out of their way to be violent and shocking both in their illustrations and in their titles

About the Symbols

Neo-Nazis, racist skinheads, white supremacists and others in the hate movement use symbols like swastikas, "SS" thunderbolts, runes and group logos to intimidate individuals and communities. Hate symbols are more than just "signs" demonstrating racist, anti-Semitic and anti-Christian attitudes and beliefs — these symbols are meant to instill a sense of fear and insecurity. One finds hate symbols scrawled on the outside walls of synagogues, churches and schools; depicted on fliers and literature distributed in communities; tattooed on the bodies of white supremacists, or proudly displayed as jewelry or on clothing. These symbols give haters a sense of power and belonging, and a quick way of identifying with others who share their ideology. They offer a visual vocabulary that is used by a variety of extremists including the Ku Klux Klan, the neo-Nazi National Alliance and such Identity groups1 as Aryan Nations and the Posse Comitatus.

The ADL database contains  symbols used by neo-Nazis, the Ku Klux Klan, racist skinheads, established hate groups, white supremacists and racist prison gangs.  Not surprisingly, there is some degree of overlap among symbols used by these various groups.

1 Identity groups believe that white Europeans, not Jews, are the real Biblical "Chosen People," that Jews are the children of Satan, that the white race is inherently superior to others and that Blacks and other non-whites are "mud people" without a soul.

General Racist Symbols

A wide spectrum of racist groups, from neo-Nazis to the Klan to white power-oriented skinheads, use these symbols interchangeably. They are instantly recognizable by those who employ them and serve as a common language for them to communicate their ideas. Most represent some aspect of what they consider "Aryan" culture or "white pride."

racist symbol - Celtic Cross
racist symbol - Outlined Odin Rune
racist symbol - Odin Rune

racist symbol - Confederate Flag
racist-symbol - Aryan or White Power Fist
racist symbol - Heavy Odin Rune

Neo-Nazi Symbols

The groups that use neo-Nazi symbols generally idolize Adolf Hitler and idealize the National Socialist ideology he and his party promoted and acted on in Germany in the 1930s and 1940s. Symbols that were employed in Nazi Germany, such as the swastika and SS bolts, feature prominently in the current neo-Nazi repertoire.

neo-nazi symbol - Nazi Flag
neo-nazi symbol - Eagle on Swastika
neo-nazi symbol - SS Lightning Bolts
racist symbol - Odin Rune

neo-nazi symbol - Death's Head
neo-nazi symbol - Iron Cross with Swastika
neo-nazi symbol - Three Sevens

Skinhead Symbols

Both racist and non-racist skinheads use specific symbols to identify themselves with their own subculture, and to help them feel that they are part of a self-recognized community. Some of these symbols focus on the traditional "look" of skinheads; others glorify the violent culture often associated with skinheads. Still others are specific logos of the white supremacist groups many neo-Nazi skinheads join.

skinhead symbol - Boots
skinhead symbol - Hammerskins
skinhead symbol - Hammerskin Logo
skinhead symbol - Crucified Skinhead

shikhead symbol - Skinhead Girl
skinhead symbol -- Skin Fist
skinhead symbol -- War Skins
skinhead symbol -- Three Sevens Link

Group Symbols

Many extremist organizations spreading their racist and anti-Semitic hate-filled propaganda want to distinguish their individual group from others with a similar ideology. They create their own logo, which usually consists of racist and neo-Nazi symbols. These logos become part of the group’s calling card and can be found on their publications and fliers.

group symbol -- American Front
group symbol -- American Nazi Party
group symbol -- Aryan Nations
group symbol -- Hammerskins

group symbol -- Ku Klux Klan
group symbol -- National Alliance
group symbol -- NAAWP
group symbol -- Crosstar

group symbol -- National Socialist Movement
group symbol - The Order
group symbol - Posse Comitatus
group symbol -- Stormfront

group symbol -- Posse Comitatus
group symbol -- World Church of the Creator

Prison Tattoos

Although many people entering the prison population are affiliated with the hate movement before their incarceration, prisoners from different ethnic backgrounds often join racist gangs once inside the penal system. They join these groups not only because they adhere to the gang’s racist ideology, but also for protection and as a way to participate in criminal activity within the prison. These inmates’ tattoos offer important information about gang affiliation, personal history and criminal activity.

prison tattoo -- Elbow Web
prison tattoo -- AB Clover
prison tattoo -- Aryan Brotherhood

prison tattoo -- Nazi Low Riders
prison tattoo -- Black Guerilla Family

The Importance of Understanding These Symbols

It is important for community groups, schools, religious institutions and law enforcement agencies to recognize these symbols and what they mean. Through knowledge of hate symbols, teachers and community leaders may be able to identify hate group members in their neighborhoods who try to recruit young people to their cause via publications, fliers, music and the Internet. Teachers and community leaders may also be able to identify individuals who are involved in racist and anti-Semitic incidents. Likewise, law enforcement officials with knowledge of hate symbols may be able to classify graffiti on churches, synagogues, or schools as hate crimes because of their association with racist or anti-Semitic ideology.

Being able to identify and understand these symbols also allows teachers, law enforcement and others in the community to be vigilant against haters who use them to intimidate and frighten others.

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